Loading…
Letter of Aristeas
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A second-century bc account of the origins of the Septuagint (LXX), the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament. Letter of Aristeas often gets categorized as pseudepigraphal, due to its relationship to the Septuagint and its legendary nature.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Aristeas, Letter of
Aristeas, Letter of A second-century bc account of the origins of the Septuagint (LXX), the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament. Letter of Aristeas often gets categorized as pseudepigraphal, due to its relationship to the Septuagint and its legendary nature.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Aristeas, Letter of
ARISTEAS, LETTER OF. The Letter of Aristeas addressed by Aristeas to a certain Philocrates describes the translation of the Pentateuch into Greek. As such, it is one of the principal sources of information about the origins of the SEPTUAGINT (LXX).A. SummaryThe contents of the Letter (Let. Aris.) can
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Aristeas
Aristeas (Gk. Aristaɩ́os), LETTER OFPurported to be an epistle from Aristeas, a member of Ptolemy II Philadelphus’ court, to his brother Philocrates, this pseudepigraphon tells a story of the translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek (the LXX). Aristeas describes how Ptolemy II (285–247 b.c.e.) came
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Aristeas, Letter of (Writing)
ARISTEAS [ărˊĭs tēˊəs] (Gk. Aristaios), LETTERS OF. A pseudepigraphal apologetic book, mistakenly identified as an epistle because of its dedication to the author’s brother, Philocrates. It is purportedly a contemporary account of the events related to the Septuagint translation of the Pentateuch.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Aristeas, Letter of
Aristeas, Letter of. A Jewish pseudepigraphic letter written in Greek which claims to have been written by one Aristeas, an official at the court of Ptolemy Philadelphus (285–247 bc). It contains a legend describing how the *Septuagint came to be miraculously written. Its composition has been variously
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Aristeas
ARISTEAS (Letter of).—This interesting piece of fiction may find a place in this Dictionary, because it gives the first account of that work which more than any other paved the way of the gospel in early times, namely, the Greek translation of the OT, the so-called Septuagint. There is no agreement as
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Aristeas, Letter of (Writing)
Aristeas, Letter of air′is-tee′uhs (Ἀριστέας). The title given to a document purporting to be an eyewitness account of the circumstances that led up to the translation of the Jewish Scriptures into Greek (i.e., the origin of the Septuagint). Although commonly called the Letter/Epistle of Aristeas (the
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Aristeas
ARISTEASIn tradition, Aristeas (3rd century B.C.) was an official of Ptolemy Philadelphus, the ruler who commissioned the translation of the Septuagint.[Ptolemy] Philadelphus chose such a man for this responsibility and appointed him to the oversight of his most noble library. I speak of Aristeas,
Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity
Aristeas, Letter Of
ARISTEAS, Letter of. Jewish document intending to explain how the Law was translated from Hebrew to Greek by 72 sages of *Jerusalem, summoned to the Museum of *Alexandria by Ptolemy Philadelphus in the mid-3rd c. BC. The author tries to lend a sacred character to a simple Greek translation of the Pentateuch,
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ARISTEAS, LETTER OF
ARISTEAS, LETTER OF air´is-tee´uhs. The Letter of Aristeas is the oldest and fullest extant account of the origins of the LXX, specifically the Greek translation of the Pentateuch. Thus, the 3rd cent. Christian writer Eusebius titled the document “Concerning the Translation of the Law of the Jews,” even