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Leek
Leeks
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Leek
Leek[Heb ḥāṣîr]. An herb of the lily family characterized by a cylindrical bulb and linear succulent leaves. Its flavor is similar to the onion’s but more pungent. Although Heb. ḥāṣîr is almost always translated “grass,” its association in Nu. 11:5 with garlic and onions has caused it, at least
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Leeks
leeks, the biennial herb Allium porrum, similar to garlic and onion. A staple in the ancient Near Eastern diet, leeks were reportedly yearned for by the Hebrews while in the wilderness (Num. 11:5) as a symbol of more abundant life.Leek.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Leek
LeekAn herb (Allium porru) believed to have originated in Central Asia. Unlike the onion, its base does not form a bulb and is more aromatic. Num. 11:5 notes that leeks were craved by the Israelites of the Exodus. Heb. ḥāṣɩ̂r, which can mean herbs or grass, has caused some to believe that fenugreek
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Leek
Leek (Heb. ḥāṣîr).†] An herb (Allium porrum L.) related to the onion and the garlic. In ancient times leeks were widely used in both Palestine and Egypt, where the Israelites became acquainted with them (Num. 11:5). Because the Hebrew term is otherwise translated more generally as “grass” (e.g.,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Leeks
Leeks (Heb. châtsı̂r). The leek was a bulbous vegetable resembling the onion. Its botanical name is Allium porrum. The Israelites in the wilderness longed for the leeks and onions of Egypt. Num. 11:5. The word châtsîr, which in Num. 11:5 is translated leeks, occurs twenty times in the Hebrew text. The
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Leek
Leek(Heb. hatsir; the Allium porrum), rendered “grass” in 1 Kings 18:5, 2 Kings 19:26, Job 40:15, etc.; “herb” in Job 8:12; “hay” in Prov. 27:25, and Isa. 15:6; “leeks” only in Num. 11:5. This Hebrew word seems to denote in this last passage simply herbs, such as lettuce or savoury herbs cooked as kitchen
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Leeks
Leeksleeks, the biennial herb Allium porrum, similar to garlic and onion. A staple in ancient Near East diet, leeks were reportedly yearned for by the Hebrews while in the wilderness (Num. 11:5) as a symbol of more abundant life.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
LEEKS
LEEKS<leks> (חָציר‎ [chatsir]; [τὰ πράσα, ta prasa]): This word, elsewhere translated “grass,” is in Numbers 11:5 rendered “leeks” in all the ancient VSS, on account of its association with garlic and onions; such a use of the word occurs in the Talmud The leek (Allium porrum) is much grown today
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Leeks
Leeks. The Hebrew word, which in Num. 11:5 is translated leeks, occurs twenty times in the Old Testament. It is derived from a root signifying “to be green,” and properly denotes grass. It may stand for any green food, and may be used very much as we use the term “greens.” It is a fact, suggestive perhaps
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Leeks
LEEKS Either Allium porrum, a bulbous vegetable, or Tragonella foenumgraecum, a grasslike herb. An Egyptian food eaten by the Hebrews during their captivity. After a steady diet of manna in the wilderness, they were ready to return to slavery and the foods of servitude (Num. 11:5). See Plants.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Leek
leek. A vegetable (Allium porrum) related to the onion, mentioned only once as one of the foods that the Israelites missed on their trek to the Promised Land (Num. 11:5; it is uncertain whether the Hebrew term here, ḥāṣîr H2946, derives from the same root as the common term for grass, ḥāṣîr H2945).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Leeks
LEEKS, lēks (חָצִיר‎, hāçīr; τὰ πράσα, tá prása): This word, elsewhere trd “grass,” is in Nu 11:5 rendered “leeks” in all the ancient VSS, on account of its association with garlic and onions; such a use of the word occurs in the Talm. The leek (Allium porrum) is much grown today in Pal, while
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