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Lamp
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Lamp, Lampstand
Lamp, Lampstand. Israelite lamps developed from those in general use among the Canaanites in the 2nd millennium bc. Their shape was similar to a shell or saucer with a lip. Lamps of stone, metal, and shells were used, although the majority were of pottery. A multitude of clay lamps, fashioned in a variety
Candlestick
Candle, Candlestick. kjv usage for words more correctly translated as “lamp” and “lampstand.” Candles in the modern sense, typically made of wax and containing a wick, were unknown in ancient times.See Lamp, Lampstand.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Lamp
Lamp[Heb nēr, nîr, nir (Prov. 21:4), māʾōr (Ex. 25:6), menôrâ(2 K. 4:10); Gk. lýchnos, lampás]; AV also LIGHT, CANDLE, CANDLESTICK (2 K. 4:10), “plowing” (Prov. 21:4); NEB also FLAME, LIGHT, “shines” (Prov. 20:27), EMBERS, LANTERN. In Prov. 21:4 the RSV emends nir to read nēr, following the
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Lamp, Lampstand
LAMP, LAMPSTAND Israelite lamps developed from those in general use among the Canaanites in the second millennium bc. Their shape was similar to a shell or saucer with a lip. Lamps of stone, metal, and shells were used, although the majority were made of pottery. A multitude of clay lamps, fashioned
Candle, Candlestick
CANDLE*, CANDLESTICK* kjv words more correctly translated as “lamp” and “lampstand.” Candles in the modern sense, typically made of wax and containing a wick, were unknown in ancient times. See Lamp, Lampstand.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Lamp
lamp, a vessel used to keep and control fire as a source of light. The development of such a vessel was a major achievement of early human history. This vessel, known as the oil lamp, had two basic parts: a receptacle for the oil and a wick inserted into the oil whose protruding end would burn. Olives
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Lamp
LAMPTranslation. The words rendered “lamp” in English versions are Heb. lappı̂d and nēr, and Gr. lampas and lychnos. Heb. lappı̂d means “torch” (BDB. p. 542), and is translated in the LXX (Gen 15:17) by Gr. lampas, the basic meaning of which is “torch” (Arndt, p. 466). Heb. nēr means “lamp” (BDB,
Candle
CANDLE. This word is found nine times in the OT as the rendering of nēr, and in the NT for luchnos. In all these references in the ASV the more exact rendering “lamp” is used. The candle, in our sense of the term, was unknown in antiquity. See Lamp; Pottery.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Lamp
LampFairly small vessels, much like a small bowl, holding oil into which a wick was placed.Oil lamps are known well before the 4th millennium b.c.e. when stone bowls containing oil were burned. By the 3rd millennium a round saucer or shallow bowl evolved into a lamp, typically with four slight depressions
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Lamp
Lamp (Heb. nēr; Gk. lýchnos, lampás).† Originally a shallow clay or pottery bowl having a crimp in the rim to hold a wick fed by oil. By the fifth century B.C. metal lamps had been introduced. The form of the lamp evolved gradually, first by elongating the crimp, later by folding the edges together,
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Lamps
LAMPS The lamp, in the form of a small clay bowl in which oil was burned, was the most common form of domestic lighting from very early times. As olive oil was plentiful in Palestine, this was the fuel normally used in lamps (cf. Exod. 27:20; Lev. 24:2); the wick was usually made of flax (Isa. 42:3).
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Lamp
LAMP ניר‎, נרI. The Hebrew noun nîr or nēr, denotes a light-giving body and is never used as a divine name, but it may occur as a surname of a deity or as the name of a being participating in the divine sphere, such as an →angel. Its Akkadian equivalent nūru, as well as Ugaritic nrt and nyr, are used
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Lamp
LAMP A principal source of light in the biblical world other than daylight. The typical lamp in ancient times was a clay pot with oil in it, into which a wick was inserted to absorb and burn the oil gradually. The wick was made of flax or other materials, and the oil used in the lamp was normally olive
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