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Laban
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Laban, Son of Bethuel
Laban, Son of Bethuel (לבן‎, lbn; “white”). Great nephew of Abraham, brother of Rebekah, father of Leah and Rachel (Gen 24:15–29), and uncle and father-in-law to Jacob (Gen 27:43; 28:2). He was an Aramean from Padadan-aram, which is also identified with Haran.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Laban (Person)
LABAN (PERSON) [Heb lābān (לָבָן)]. Name of the son of Bethuel (Gen 28:5). In Gen 29:5 he is called “the son of Nahor”; however, this expression should be understood in the sense of “grandson” or “descendant.” According to the genealogy given in the book of Genesis, Terah was the father of Abraham
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Laban (Person)
Laban (Person). Bethuel’s son (Gn 24:24, 29), brother of Rebekah (Gn 24:15, 29), father of Leah and Rachel (Gn 29:16), and the uncle and father-in-law of Jacob. Laban’s forebears lived in Ur, but his father, Bethuel, was called the Aramaean of Paddan-aram and Laban also is referred to as the Aramaean
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Laban
Laban lāʹbən [Heb. lāḇān—‘white’; Gk. Laban]. Son of Bethuel, grandson of Nahor, and brother of Rebekah (Gen. 24:24, 29; 25:20; 28:5). He belonged to the branch of the family of Terah derived from Abraham’s brother Nahor and niece Milcah. The genealogy of this branch (22:20–24), true to its purpose
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Laban (Person)
LABAN (Person) Bethuel’s son (Gn 24:24, 29), brother of Rebekah (vv 15, 29), father of Leah and Rachel (29:16), and the uncle and father-in-law of Jacob. Laban’s forebears lived in Ur, but his father, Bethuel, was called the Aramean of Paddan-aram, and Laban also is referred to as the Aramean (kjv “Syrian,”
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Laban
LABAN. The son of Bethuel; grandson of Nahor, Abraham’s brother; and uncle of Jacob. He lived in Haran of Padan-aram in Mesopotamia (Gen 24:15; 28:2; 29:4–5). When Abraham sent a servant of Laban’s country to find a bride for Isaac, Laban looked with covetous eyes on the gold rings and bracelets bestowed
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Laban
LABAN (Heb. laḇan, ‘white’).1. A descendant of Abraham’s brother Nahor (Gn. 22:20–23), son of Bethuel (Gn. 28:5), Rebekah’s brother (Gn. 24:47ff.) and uncle and father-in-law of Jacob (Gn. 27:43; 28:2). Laban’s branch of the family had remained in Harran, but the close ethnic affinity was maintained
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Laban
Laban (Heb. lāḇān) (PERSON)An inhabitant of the city of Nahor, in the area of Haran. Haran and the surrounding region belonged to the district called Paddan-aram; thus, Laban is called “the Aramean” (Gen. 25:20; 28:5; 31:20, 24). First introduced as the brother of Rebekah (Gen. 24:29), Laban was
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Laban (Person)
LABAN [lāˊbən] (Heb. lāḇān “white”) (PERSON). An Aramean (Gen. 25:20; 28:5; 31:24) living in Paddan-aram, in Haran (29:4–5; 27:43); the son of Bethuel, grandson of Nahor (Abraham’s brother), brother of Rebekah (24:29; 28:5), and father of Leah and Rachel (29:16).Laban played a more important role
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Laban
LABAN לבןI. On the assumption that he was originally a semi-divine hero or a god (Meyer 1906), Laban, the son of Bethuel (Gen 28:5) and father of →Leah and →Rachel (Gen 29:16) has been connected with the Old Assyrian god Laba(n) (E. Schrader, Die Keilinschriften und das Alte Testament [Berlin 1903;
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Laban
LABAN The son of Bethuel (Gen 28:5), the brother of Rebekah (Gen 22:23; 24:29), and the father of Jacob’s wives Leah and Rachel (Gen 29:16). He lived in the city of Haran (Gen 27:43; 29:4) and is called an Aramean (Gen 25:20; 31:20). He is first mentioned in Gen 24:29 when Abraham decided to find a wife
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Laban
La´ban (white).1. Son of Bethuel, brother of Rebekah and father of Leah and Rachel. (b.c. about 1860–1740.) The elder branch of the family remained at Haran, Mesopotamia, when Abraham removed to the land of Canaan, and it is there that we first meet with Laban, as taking the leading part in the betrothal