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Kneeling
Abrech • Abrek • Bend the Knee • Kneel
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Kneeling
Kneeling. Position often denoting worship, respect, or submission. A strong knee symbolically implied a man with strength of faith and purpose, and thus bowing the knee indicated submission to a superior. The knee was bowed before a king, a ruler, a governor, or God. Genesis 41:43 describes the people
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Abrek
Abrek āʹbrek [Heb. ’aḇrēk; Gk. ké̄ryx] (Gen. 41:43, RSV mg); AV, RSV, “bow the knee”; AV mg “tender father”; NEB “make way.” A salutation of uncertain meaning which the Egyptians proclaimed before Joseph, when as grand vizier, second to Pharaoh, he appeared in his official chariot.Explanations
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Kneeling
KNEELING Position often denoting worship, respect, or submission. A strong knee symbolically implied a man with strength of faith and purpose, and thus bowing the knee indicated submission to a superior. The knee was bowed before a king, a ruler, a governor, or God. Genesis 41:43 describes the people
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Abrech
ABRECH. An obscure term proclaimed before Joseph as Pharaoh’s chief minister (Gn. 41:43). W. Spiegelberg interpreted it as Egyp. lb-r.k ‘attention!’, ‘look out!’ J. Vergote suggests l.brk, ‘pay homage!’, ‘kneel!’, an Egyptian imperative of a Semitic loan-word (Joseph en Égypte, 1959, pp. 135–141, 151).
Knee, Kneel
KNEE, KNEEL. The concrete imagery of the OT expresses weakness or fear as ‘feeble knees’ (Jb. 4:4; Is. 35:3) or as ‘the knees tremble’, ‘knock together’ (Na. 2:10; Dn. 5:6).The fifteen references in the NT are, with the exception of Heb. 12:12, always used in connection with bowing. The action may indicate
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Kneeling
KneelingA position of humility, surrender, respect, and adoration. Bowing the knee was an expression of honor and submission to royalty and various governmental and religious authorities (Gen. 41:43). Kneeling was also a posture of giving birth (1 Sam. 4:19), and it symbolized the legal acceptance of
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Kneeling
Kneeling (Heb. bāraḵ; Gk. gonypetéō). A position of submission adopted toward a superior person or deity for purposes either of petition or worship. Solomon prayed while kneeling (1 Kgs. 8:54; 2 Chr. 6:13), as did Ezra (Ezra 9:5) and Daniel (Dan. 6:10). This was also the posture taken during
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Kneeling
KNEELING — falling to one’s knees as a gesture of reverence, obedience, or respect. In the dedication of the Temple in Jerusalem, Solomon knelt before God (1 Kin. 8:54). Daniel knelt in prayer three times a day (Dan. 6:10).
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Knee, Kneel
Knee, KneelIn the thirty-five appearances of the image in Scripture, knees are most often used to signify the state of one person before another, either in submission, blessing or fear.Submission or humility is perhaps the most common image. When one places oneself in subjection to another, one kneels
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ABRECH
ABRECH<a’-brek>: Transliteration of the Hebrew אַבְרֵךְ‎ [’abhrekh], in Genesis 41:43 the Revised Version, margin, of which both the origin and meaning are uncertain. It was the salutation which the Egyptians addressed to Joseph, when he was made second to Pharaoh, and appeared in his official chariot.
KNEE; KNEEL
KNEE; KNEEL<ne> <nel> (“knee,” בֶּרֶךְ‎ [berekh]; Aramaic אַרַכֻבָּה‎ [’arekhubbah]; [γόνυ, gonu]; “kneel”; בָּרַךְ‎ [barakh]; Aramaic בְּרַךְ‎ [berakh]; [γονυπετέω, gonupeto]): Most of the uses are obvious, and the figurative use of “knees” as the symbol of strength (Job 4:4; Hebrews 12:12,
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Kneeling
kneeling. A *gesture of humility and supplication (Mt 17:14; 20:20). Genuflexion is touching one knee to the ground.
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Kneeling
KNEELING.—A comparison of the passages that refer to bodily posture seems to prove that kneeling is nowhere intended unless the word ‘knee’ (γόνυ) forms part of the expression. The word προσκυνέω, usually tr. ‘worship,’ always denotes prostration, not kneeling. Kneeling is referred to as—(a) A posture
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Kneel
KNEEL A common posture in worship (1 Kings 19:18; Ps. 95:6; Isa. 45:23) and prayer (1 Kings 8:54; 2 Chron. 6:13; Ezra 9:5; Dan. 6:10; Acts 7:60; 9:40; 20:36; Eph. 3:14), although other postures are also found in the Bible. In the OT prayers are most often offered while standing (e.g., 1 Sam. 1:26; 2
Key passages
Mt 17:14

And when they came to the crowd, a man approached him, kneeling down before him

Mt 20:20

Then the mother of the sons of Zebedee came up to him with her sons, and kneeling down she asked something from him.