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Kain (Place)
Cain • Kain
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Kain (Place)
KAIN (PLACE) [Heb qayin (קַיִן)]. Appears in the enumeration of cities in districts belonging to Judah (Josh 15:57). Its grouping with several other towns of fairly certain identification, namely Maon, Carmel, Ziph, and Juttah, leads to a plausible identification of Kain with en-Nebi Yaqin (M.R. 164100).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Kain (Place)
Kain (Place). Town in the Judean hill country (Jos 15:57, kjv Cain). Its place in the same district as the known cities of Maon, Carmel, Ziph, and Juttah (v 55) favors its identification with Khirbet Yuqim, southwest of Hebron.
Cain (Place)
Cain (Place). kjv spelling of Kain, the name of a city in the southern hill country of Judah’s territory, in Joshua 15:57.See Kain (Place).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Kain
Kain kān [Heb. haqqayin—‘the Kenite, smith’ (?)]. A city in the southern hill country of Judah, in a grouping of “ten cities and their villages” that were part of the tribal allotment of Judah (Josh. 15:57). Included in the group are a number of places that can be located SE of Hebron (see Judah, Territory
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Kain (Place)
KAIN (Place) Town in the Judean hill country (Jos 15:57). Its place in the same district as the known cities of Maon, Carmel, Ziph, and Juttah (v 55) favors its identification with Khirbet Yuqim, southwest of Hebron.
Cain (Place)
CAIN* (Place) kjv spelling of Kain, the name of a city in the southern hill country of Judah’s territory, in Joshua 15:57. See Kain (Place).
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Cain
Cain (kayn; Heb., “metalworker,” although Gen. 4:1 connects it with a verb meaning “to acquire” or “create”).1 Adam and Eve’s first son, a farmer whose offering God rejected. Angered, Cain killed Abel (whose offering had been accepted) and subsequently denied knowledge of his whereabouts. As a punishment,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Cain
CAIN1. The older brother of Abel, Cain is pictured in Genesis as the first child to be born of the first parents, Adam and Eve. The name is explained as meaning “gotten” (from Heb. qānâ, Gen 4:1), but the exact form qayin can also mean “spear” or “smith.” He was a “tiller of the ground” (v. 2).Cain
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Cain
CAIN (Heb. qayin). 1. The eldest son of Adam and Eve (Gn. 4:1), at whose birth Eve said, ‘I have gotten (qānîṯî) a man’ (av). Since this account is unlikely to have been originally couched in Heb., no judgment can be made on the validity of the pun, and nothing can be concluded from apparent etymologies
Kain
KAIN. A town to the S of Hebron (Jos. 15:57). Khirbet Yaqin has been suggested, but its antiquity is uncertain. lxx takes as one name with Zanoah, altering the count (*Zanoah, 2).J. D. Douglas
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Kain (Place)
Kain (Heb. qayin) (PLACE)A settlement included in the list of towns in the tribal allotment of Judah (Josh. 15:57). It has most often been identified with en-Nebi Yaqin (164100), a small site ca. 10 km. (6 mi.) SE of Hebron. Unfortunately, the site has not been systematically examined by archaeologists.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Kain (Place)
KAIN [kān] (Heb. haqqayin) (PLACE)* According to Josh. 15:57, a city in the southern hill country of Judah (KJV “Cain”). The name suggests that it might have been a Kenite possession. Some scholars would locate the city at modern Khirbet Yaqin, southeast of Hebron.Following the LXX, some scholars
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Cain
Cain, one of the cities in the low country of Judah, named with Zanoah and Gibeah. Josh. 15:57.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Kain
KAIN (kān). A city of the low country of Judah (Josh. 15:57; “Cain,” KJV), Khirbet Yagin, three miles SE of Hebron.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Kain
KainKain (kayn). 1 An alternative name for the clan called Kenites (Num. 24:22, kjv: ‘the Kenite’). 2 A city of Judah (Josh. 15:57, kjv: ‘Cain’), whose location may be modern Khirbet Yaqin, about seven miles southeast of Hebron, traditionally viewed as a Kenite city. Arab tradition associates it with
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