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Justin Martyr
Justin
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Justin Martyr (Person)
JUSTIN MARTYR (PERSON). Justin Martyr was the most significant of the 2d-century apologists for Christianity. He was born in Samaria, lived for a time at Ephesus, and finally conducted a training school for Christians at Rome until his martyrdom about 165. His most famous pupil was the Syrian Tatian,
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Justin Martyr, St
Justin Martyr, St (c. 100–c. 165), early Christian *Apologist. He was born of pagan parents at Flavia Neapolis (‘Nablus’), the ancient Shechem in *Samaria. He was converted from pagan philosophy to Christianity c. 130, though whether the account of his search through various philosophies (Dial. 2) is
The Dictionary of Historical Theology
Justin Martyr (d. c. 165)
Justin Martyr (d. c. 165)Justin was executed, together with some of his pupils, in Rome about 165. We know of his life only by a martyrology and some autobiographical passages in his own writings. He was an uncircumcised Palestinian from Samaria who, after conventional education, sought a true philosophy.
The Westminster Dictionary of Theologians
Justin
Justin (ca. 100–ca. 165). Known as Justin Martyr. He was the most important of the Greek Apologists of the second century. J. was a native of Samaria, the son of pagan parents, and he spent a good part of his youth in a philosophical quest for truth. After testing Stoic, Aristotelian, Pythagorean, and
131 Christians Everyone Should Know
Justin Martyr
Evangelists and ApologistsJustin MartyrDefender of the “true philosophy”“I fell in love with the prophets and these men who had loved Christ; I reflected on all their words and found that this philosophy alone was true and profitable.”When Justin was arrested for his faith in Rome, the prefect
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
2. Justin Martyr
2. Justin Martyr.—The works of Justin that are relevant in this connexion are the two Apologies and the Dialogue with Trypho the Jew. They may be set within the limits a.d. 140–161. Palestine was his birthplace, and he was brought up in the religion of his father, who was a heathen. He was an ardent
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr.—The controversy of Justin with Trypho deserves notice in connexion with this subject on several grounds. Justin Martyr was a native of Samaria. He was born at Flavia Neapolis, a town which occupied the place of Sichem, the old capital of Samaria, and which was colonized with Greeks by
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr juhs’tin-mahr’tuhr (Ἰουστῖνος). Born of pagan parents in Samaria probably at the beginning of the 2nd cent., Justin was a student of philosophy who became a Christian sometime before A.D. 135. He taught Christianity for a period in Ephesus, where he was opposed by a Jewish scholar named
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Justin Martyr
JUSTIN MARTYRJustin Martyr (c. 110–165) was a philosopher who converted to Christianity and became a tireless evangelist. He died as a martyr during the reign of Marcus Aurelius.I gave no thought to any of my people, that is, the Samaritans, when I communicated in writing with Caesar. Rather, I stated
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr (ca. 100–ca. 165). Probably the most well-known Christian apologist of the second century, rigorously defending the faith against Roman, Jewish, and gnostic authorities. He was born in Flavia Neapolis in Samaria. He received a Greek education that included various Platonic and Stoic schools
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
JUSTIN MARTYR
JUSTIN MARTYR. Apologist, teacher, and martyr (ca. 110–ca. 165 ce). Born to a pagan family from Flavia Neapolis (Palestine), Justin became a wandering student of philosophy. His conversion to Christianity was intellectual. He founded a Christian academy in Rome (ca. 150 ce); Tatian was a student. Controversy