Loading…
Junia
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A kinsman of Paul, to whom he sent greetings in his letter to the Romans (Rom 16:7). Many scholars believe that Junia (or Junias) was a woman, the first to be called an “apostle.” Junia is sometimes assumed to be the wife of Andronicus. For further information on this debate, see this article: Women in Church Leadership.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Junia
Junia (Ἰουνιᾶς, Iounias). A kinsman of Paul, to whom he sent greetings in his letter to the Romans (Rom 16:7). Many scholars believe that Junia (or Junias) was a woman, the first to be called an “apostle.” Junia is sometimes assumed to be the wife of Andronicus. For further information on this debate,
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Junias (Person)
JUNIAS (PERSON) [Gk Iounia (Ἰουνια)]. The only woman who is called an “apostle” in the NT (Rom 16:7). She was born a Jew, and is closely associated to Andronicus. Her name was the Lat name of the gens Junia (see the material in Lampe 1985 and StadtrChr, 66–67, 146–47, 152–53, 296). Women were often
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Junias, Junia
Junias, Junia. Jew who, along with Andronicus, was greeted by Paul in his letter to the church in Rome (16:7, kjv Junia). He had some status among the apostles and may have held an office under their direction. He was also a prisoner with Paul at one time for the cause of the gospel.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Junias
Juniasjōōnē-as [Gk. Iounias, Iounia]; AV JUNIA. One to whom, with Andronicus, Paul sent greetings at the close of his letter to the Romans (Rom. 16:7). The name may be masculine, “Junias,” a contraction of Junianus, or feminine, “Junia”; it is Iounian, the accusative form, that is given. In all
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Junia
JUNIA A Jew who, along with Andronicus, was greeted by Paul in his letter to the church in Rome—according to the reading of some manuscripts (Rom 16:7). Paul recognized Junia as an apostle who had been a prisoner with Paul for the sake of the gospel. This person could have been a male or female. See
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Junia
Junia (joo´nee-uh), a Christian to whom Paul sends greetings in Rom. 16:7. It is unclear whether a masculine name (niv, rsv: Junias) or a feminine name (kjv, nrsv: Junia) is intended, since some Greek manuscripts read the one and other manuscripts read the other. The masculine form, however, is not found
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Junia
JUNIA, JUNIAS. Christian at Rome (most probably a man, although the accusative form [Ioynian] in Rom 16:7 is ambiguous as to gender). He, with Andronicus, is greeted by Paul as a fellow Jew (cf. (Rom 9:3), a fellow prisoner (during some otherwise unknown imprisonment; (2 Cor 11:23), a man “of note among
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Andronicus and Junias, Junia
ANDRONICUS AND JUNIAS, JUNIA. (av ‘Junia’ is feminine—perhaps Andronicus’ wife? rsv ‘Junias’ would be masculine, contracted from Junianus.) Affectionately greeted by Paul (Rom. 16:7) as (1) ‘kinsmen’, i.e. probably fellow-Jews, as in Rom. 9:3 (but see MM, syngenēs, for this word as a title of honour);
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Junia
Junia (Gk. Iouvɩ́a)Probably the wife of Andronicus; member of a husband-wife team who, like Paul, were Jews, Christians before him, imprisoned with him, and “prominent among the apostles” (Rom. 16:7). All early sources attest Junia as female (esp. Jerome and John Chrysostom). Although the name often
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Junias
Junias [jōōˊnĭ əs] (Gk. Iounias).† A Jewish Christian in Rome, perhaps a female associate of Paul (the wife of Andronicus?) with whom the apostle had been imprisoned. Junias was a Christian before Paul was converted and was accorded a position of stature among the apostles (Rom. 16:7).
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Junia
Ju´nia (belonging to Juno), a Christian at Rome, mentioned by St. Paul as one of his kinsfolk and fellow prisoners, of note among the apostles, and in Christ before St. Paul. Rom. 16:7. (a.d. 55.)
See also
Relatives
Paul Relative
Topics & Themes