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Jordan
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Jordan
Jordan River (יַרְדֵּן‎, yarden; Ἰορδάνης, Iordanēs). A river that flows from Mount Hermon, south to the Sea of Galilee, then to the Dead Sea.
Jordan, Critical Issues
Jordan River, Critical Issues (יַרְדֵּן‎, yarden). The longest river in ancient Israel. Flows from Mount Hermon to the Sea of Galilee, and ends in the Dead Sea.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Jordan River
JORDAN RIVER [Heb yardēn (יַרְדֵּן)]. The river that runs from Mt. Hermon S to the Dead Sea, thus separating the W part of ancient Palestine (Cisjordan, West Jordan, “Canaan,” “the promised land” [Num 34:10–12; Josh 22:34]) from the E part (Transjordan, East Jordan, “East Palestine”[Glueck 1968]). It
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Jordan River
Jordan River. River lying in the bottom of a great canyon called the Jordan Rift, an elongated depression stretching from lower southwest Asia Minor (Syria) to the Gulf of Aqaba. The rift was once filled by the Lisan Lake, but significant geologic activity caused it to recede, and the result was the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Jordan
Jordan jôrʹdən [Heb. yardēn; Gk. Iordanēs]. The most important river in Palestine and the valley or rift in which it flows. I. Name II. Prehistoric Times III. SourcesA. Nahr BâniyâsB. Nahr LeddanC. Nahr HasbânīD. Nahr Bereighith IV. Huleh Valley V. Sea of Galilee VI. Jordan ValleyA. Western
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Jordan River
JORDAN RIVER River lying in the bottom of a great canyon called the Jordan Rift, an elongated depression stretching from lower southwest Asia Minor (Syria) to the Gulf of Aqaba. The rift was once filled by the Lisan Lake, but significant geologic activity caused it to recede, and the result was the formation
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Jordan River
Jordan River (johr´duhn) River (Heb. ha-yarden), a river that runs from north of the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea. Occupying two-thirds of the deep rift valley between Israel and Jordan, i.e., a section of the rift valley system that extends from southern Turkey about thirty-five hundred miles to the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Jordan
JORDAN. In Heb. the name of the most famous river in the Bible is yardēn. Most scholars consider the word Semitic and derive it from the root yārad, “to descend.” The name thus means “the descender,” an apt description of the river. Others theorize that the word may have an Indo-Aryan origin, in which
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Jordan
JORDAN. The Jordan depression is unique among the features of physical geography. Formed as a result of a rift valley, it is the lowest depression on earth. The headwaters of the river Jordan, fed by springs, collect into Lake Huleh, 70 m above sea-level. Ten km S at Lake Tiberias the river is already
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Jordan (Place)
Jordan (Heb. Yardēn; Gk. IordánēS) RiverThe largest and most important river in Palestine, mentioned more than any other river in the Bible. Its waters originate in four rivers that arise from the watersheds of Mt. Hermon some 65 km. (40 mi.) NE of the Sea of Galilee. Once these rivers merge, the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Jordan
Jordan [jôrˊdən] (Heb. yardēn; Gk. Iordanēs). The largest and most important river in Palestine, extending from its sources near Mt. Hermon in the north to its outlet in the Dead Sea. The etymology of the name Jordan is a point of controversy among linguists: cf. Indo-European yor “year” plus
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Jordan (River And Valley)
JORDAN (RIVER AND VALLEY) The largest river in Palestine, flowing along the geological Syro-African rift. The river is formed by the confluence of three streams in the foothills of Mount Hermon, at a height of 250 feet above sea level. As it descends to the Hula region it divides again into several streams.
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Jordan
JORDAN ירדןἸορδάνηςI. The name of the river of Jordan, (hay)yardēn, occurs 177 times in the OT. In the NT Ἰορδάνης is attested 15 times. The etymology of the name is debated. A derivation from the root yrd, ‘to descend’, implying an interpretation ‘the river that comes down’ (e.g. Philo, Leg.