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Join
Consort • Joined • Joining
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Join; Joined; Joining
Join; Joined; Joining[Heb niphal of lāwâ (Gen. 29:34; Nu. 18:2, 4; Neh. 11:36; Est. 9:27; Ps. 83:8 [MT 9]; Isa. 14:1; 56:3; Jer. 50:5; Dnl. 11:34; Zec. 2:11 [MT 15]), ḥāḇar—‘bind, unite’ (Gen. 14:3; Ex. 28:7, 27; 39:4, 20; 2 Ch. 20:35–37; Job 16:4; Eccl. 9:4 Q; Hos. 4:17), dāḇaq—‘cling to’ (Josh.
Consort
Consort “Consort with” is archaic in Acts 17:4, AV, for Gk. prosklēróō; RSV and NEB “join.”
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Joining
JOINING. Two different Heb. words are translated “joining” in KJV.1. A form of hābar, meaning “to join together, connect” (1 Chr 22:3). It is translated “coupling” in ASV and “clamps” in RSV.2. An adjective from dābaq, meaning “to cleave, adhere, join” (2 Chr 3:12).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
JOIN
JOIN<join>: Of the New Testament words, kollao, literally, “glue,” “weld together,” and its compounds, designate the closest form of personal union, as in Lk 15:15; 1 Cor 6:16; Eph 5:31. In the words of institution of marriage, [suzeugnumi] is used (Mt 19:6; Mk 10:9, literally, “yoke
CONSORT
CONSORT<kon-sort’> ([προσκληρόω, proskleroo], “to allot,” Acts 17:4). The verb may be either in the middle or passive voice. the Revised Version (British and American), the King James Version, and Luther’s German translation regard it as middle, and render it: “cast their lots with,” “associated,”
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Join
JOIN, join: Of the NT words, kolláō, lit. “glue,” “weld together,” and its compounds, designate the closest form of personal union, as in Lk 15:15; 1 Cor 6:16; Eph 5:31. In the words of institution of marriage, suzeúgnumi is used (Mt 19:6; Mk 10:9, lit. “yoke together”; cf Gen 2:24).
Consort
CONSORT, kon-sôrtʹ (προσκληρόω, prosklēróō, “to allot,” Acts 17:4). The vb. may be either in the middle or passive voice. RV, AV, and Luther’s German tr regard it as middle, and render it: “cast their lots with,” “associated,” “united with.” Inadvocacy of the passive, see Alford’s Greek Testament,