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Jews in Achaia
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Roman province that included most of southern and central Greece, with its capital in Corinth.Paul was in Corinth when Gallio was deputy of Achaia (Acts 18:12). In Acts 20:2, “Greece” means Achaia, but “Macedonia and Achaia” usually refer to the whole of Greece (Acts 19:21; Rom 15:26; 1 Thess 1:8). Paul mentions the churches of Achaia because of their generosity (2 Cor 9:13).Achaeans were the residents of the northern part of the Peloponnesian peninsula in classical Greece, and Homer refers to the Greeks as “Achaeans” in his epics. Around 280 bc, residents Achaia formed a confederation of smaller city-states called the Achaean League. In 251 bc, Aratus of Sicyon was chosen commander-in-chief. He increased the League’s power and gave it a constitution. In 146 bc, Corinth was destroyed by Rome and the League was broken up. The whole of Greece, under the name of Achaia, was transformed into a Roman province. It was divided into two separate provinces, Macedonia and Achaia, in 27 bc.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Achaia
Achaia (Ἀχαΐα, Achaia). A Roman province that included most of southern and central Greece, with its capital in Corinth.Paul was in Corinth when Gallio was deputy of Achaia (Acts 18:12). In Acts 20:2, “Greece” means Achaia, but “Macedonia and Achaia” usually refer to the whole of Greece (Acts 19:21;
Jews in the New Testament
Jews in the New Testament (οί Ἰουδαῖοι, oi Ioudaioi). In general, the New Testament uses the term “the Jews” to refer to the biological descendants of Abraham, but the term was also used to characterize specific groups of Jewish people who rejected Jesus as the Messiah.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Achaia (Place)
ACHAIA (PLACE) [Gk Achaia (Ἀχαια)]. Var. ACHAEA. A Greek region which twice gave its name to all of Greece before its Achaean League (280–146 b.c.) fell to the Romans (Polyb. 2.41; Thuc. 1.111, 115). All relevant NT references involve Corinth, Achaia’s capital (Acts 18:12, 27; 1 Cor 16:15; 2 Cor 1:1).
Jews in the NT
JEWS IN THE NT. There are many references to “Jews” in the NT. The meaning and interpretation of these references is a matter of debate among scholars.A. Historical IntroductionB. “The Jews” in MatthewC. “The Jews” in MarkD. “The Jews” in LukeE. “The Jews” in PaulF. “The Jews” in JohnG. Conclusion
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Achaia
Achaia. Name generally used in NT times to refer to the entire Greek peninsula south of Thessalonica.See Greece, Greeks.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Achaia
Achaia ə-kāʹyə [GK. Achaia]. The smallest country in the Peloponnesus, lying along the southern shore of the Corinthian Gulf, N of Arcadia and E of Elis.The original inhabitants were Ionians; but these were crowded out later by the Achaeans, who came from the east. According to Herodotus, the Ionians
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Achaia
ACHAIA Name generally used in NT times to refer to the entire Greek peninsula south of Thessalonica. See Greece, Greek.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Achaia
Achaia (uh-kay´yuh), the Roman province consisting of the southern half of the Greek peninsula. The name is derived from the designation for the Greeks in Hittite and Egyptian sources. In the division of provinces in 27 bce, the Roman province of Achaia comprised the lower half of Greece. In the nt,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Achaia
ACHAIA. In the NT Achaia refers to the southern portion of Greece, Macedonia being the northern portion (Acts 19:21; Rom 15:26; 2 Cor 1:1; 1 Thess 1:7, 8). By Claudius’ direction, in a.d. 44 it was governed by a proconsul (e.g., Gallio in (Acts 18:12, ASV), appointed by the Roman senate; the emperor
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Achaia
ACHAIA. A small region of Greece, on the S coast of the gulf of Corinth, which twice gave its name to the whole country. In Homer the Greeks are frequently called Achaeans. Again, in the age of the Hellenistic kings, the Achaean confederacy championed the freedom of the republics, and after its defeat
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Achaia
Achaia (Gk. Achaɩ́a)Home of the Achaeans, as Homer called the Greeks who attacked Troy, the dominant people in the northern Peloponnesian Peninsula of Greece during the Mycenaean period. When Rome began to threaten Greece, city states of the northern Peloponnese (Achaia proper), led by Corinth, formed
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Achaia
Achaia [ə kāˊyə] (Gk. Achaia). Originally designating only a part of the Peloponnesus, later the name came to designate the entire southern half of Greece. During Greece’s independent history, the so-called Achaean League, to which Athens and Corinth belonged, became a significant political force,
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Achaia
ACHAIA The region of lower Greece south of the Gulf of Corinth (also spelled “Achaea”). The territory was conquered by the Romans in 146 b.c. following the defeat of the Achaean League. The Romans placed Achaia under the control of the province of Macedonia. In 27 b.c., Emperor Augustus declared Achaia
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Achaia
Acha´ia (trouble) signifies in the New Testament a Roman province which included the whole of the Peloponnesus and the greater part of Hellas proper, with the adjacent islands. This province, with that of Macedonia, comprehended the whole of Greece; hence Achaia and Macedonia are frequently mentioned