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Jews
The residents of Judah (or their descendants) practicing Judaism.
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Jehudijah
Jehudijah. Not a proper name; kjv mistranslation for “Jewish,” a descriptive term distinguishing Mered’s Jewish wife from his other wife, who was an Egyptian princess (1 Chr 4:18).
Jew
Jew. Judean, belonging to Judah. The short form of the English word has developed from the French. The underlying Hebrew word is used first in 2 Kings 16:6 as a national term, meaning citizens of Judah. It came into general use in the period of Jeremiah just before the exile (late 6th century bc; see,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Jehudijah
Jehudijah jə-hoo̅-diʹje [Heb. hayehuḏîyâ] (1 Ch. 4:18, AV). The proper name of the wife of Eshtemoa in the AV. The word literally means “the Jewish (one)” and is translated “his Jewish wife” in the RSV and NEB.
Jew
Jew[Heb yehûḏî; Aram yehûḏāy; Gk. Ioudaios, ioudaízō (“live like a Jew,” Gal. 2:14), Ioudaikōs (“like a Jew,” Gal. 2:14)]; JEWESS [Gk. Ioudaia (Acts 24:24)]; JEWISH [Heb. yehûḏî]; AV JEWS (1 Ch. 4:18; Neh. 5:1, 8; Est. 6:13), “Jehudijah” (a transliteration based on a misunderstanding
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Jehudijah
JEHUDIJAH* Not a proper name; kjv mistranslation for “Jewish,” a descriptive term distinguishing Mered’s Jewish wife from his other wife, who was an Egyptian princess (1 Chr 4:18).
Jew
JEW Judean, belonging to Judah. The short form of the English word was developed from the French. The underlying Hebrew word is used first in 2 Kings 16:6 as a national term, meaning citizens of Judah. It came into general use in the period of Jeremiah just before the exile (late sixth century bc; see
Judea, Judeans
JUDEA, JUDEANS “Land of the Jews,” particularly after the Captivity. Since most of the Israelites who returned from the exile were from the tribe of Judah, they were called Judeans or Jews and their land, Judea. This part of the Holy Land has always been of great interest to the Bible student because
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Jews
Jews (jooz), a national-ethnic and, subsequently, religious designation for the people of the Judean state or province living in the homeland or in the Dispersion. In the Hebrew Bible, the term “Jews” is used only in Zech. 8:23 and in the books of Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, and Daniel. It did not become
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Jehudijah
JEHUDIJAH. The KJV lists Jehudijah as a proper name, but it is an adjective meaning “Jewess.” The term is used in reference to the Jewish wife of Mered and distinguishes her from his Egyptian wife (1 Chr 4:18).
Jew
JEW. Heb. yhûdɩ̂ specifically refers to a descendant of Judah; the name is applied to members of the tribe of that name or to those of the country of Judah (16:6; 18:26, 28; 25:25; 2 Chr 32:18; Est 2:5; 3:6; Jer 32:12; 38:19; 52:28; etc.). 1 Chr 9:3 indicates that members of other tribes resided in
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Jew
JEW (Heb. yehûḏî;, Aram. yehûḏai; Gk. joudaios; Lat. judaeaus). Originally a member of the state of *Judah (2 Ki. 16:6; Ne. 1:2; Je. 32:12) and so used by foreigners from the 8th century bc onwards (e.g. Assyr. Yaudaia, ANET, pp. 287, 301). Non-Jews used this term of the former inhabitants of the
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Jews, Judaism
Jews, JudaismThe roughly 600-year Second Temple period is framed by the destruction of the First Temple (to be rebuilt ca. 520–515 b.c.e.) and the Babylonian Exile of 586, on the one side, and the destruction of the Second Temple in the course of a Jewish revolt against Rome in 66–73 c.e., on the other.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Jehudijah
Jehudijah [jēˊhə dīˊjə] (Heb. hayehuḏiya “Jewish [woman]”).* The Jewish wife of Mered (1 Chr. 4:18, KJV). The RSV translates literally, “his Jewish wife” (NIV “Judean”); the JB reading makes her the spouse of Eshtemoa in v. 17.
Jew, Judaism
JEW (Heb. yehûḏî; Aram. yehûḏay, yehûḏāyē˒; Gk.Ioudaios), JUDAISM (Gk. Ioudaïsmos).* Originally a gentilic noun derived from Judah (Heb. yehûḏâ), the name of a son of Jacob and Leah, the tribe named for him, and the kingdom of Judah. The Hebrew term for Judahite(s) was used before
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Jew
JEW The term “Jew” has had different meanings at different times. In early Israel, it meant a member of the tribe of Judah; later, after the division of the tribes, it meant someone from the southern kingdom of Judah (2 Kgs 16:6, translated “men of Judah”; 25:25; Neh 1:2; Jer 32:12, 38:19, 52:28–30).
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Jews, Christian attitudes to
Jews, Christian attitudes to. Christianity shares much common ground with Judaism. Jesus Christ was Himself a Jew, as were the earliest members of the Church. St *Paul’s practice of not requiring Gentile converts to Christianity to be circumcised and observe the whole Jewish law, and his argument that
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Jehudijah
Jehudi´jah (the Jewess). There is really no such name in the Hebrew Bible as that which our Authorized Version exhibits at 1 Chron. 4:18. If it is a proper name at all, it is Ha-jehudijah, like Hammelech, Hak-koz, etc.; and it seems to be rather an appellative, “the Jewess.”
Jew
Jew (a man of Judea). This name was properly applied to a member of the kingdom of Judah after the separation of the ten tribes. The term first makes its appearance just before the captivity of the ten tribes. 2 Kings 16:6. After the return the word received a larger application. Partly from the predominance
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Jehudijah
JEHUDI´JAH (je-hū-diʹja; “Jewess”). Probably the wife of Mered (1 Chron. 4:18). The KJV renders this word as a proper name, whereas it most likely refers merely to the fact that she was a Jewess (NASB, “his Jewish wife”). She is the mother of Jered, Heber, and Jekuthiel.
Jew
JEW (jū; Heb. yhûdı̂). A Jehudite, i.e., descendant of Judah; Gk. Ioudaios, a name formed from that of the patriarch Judah and applied first to the tribe or country of Judah or to a subject of the kingdom of Judah (2 Kings 25:25; Jer. 32:12; 38:19; 40:11, 41:3; 52:28) in distinction from the seceding
Jewish
JEWISH (Gk. Ioudaı̈kos). Of or belonging to Jews. The apostle Paul warns his young brother against Jewish myths, i.e., the rabbinical legends (Titus 1:14).