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Jesus is flogged (John)
Pilate had Jesus flogged. The soldiers put a crown of thorns and a purple robe on him.
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Flogging
Flogging. Beating a person with a whip or other instrument, sometimes used as a legislated punishment.See Criminal Law and Punishment.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Flog
Flog [hiphil of Heb. nāḵâ-‘strike, smite’] (Prov. 17:26); AV STRIKE; NEB INFLICT BLOWS; [Heb. mahalumôṯ—‘strokes’] Prov. 18:6; 19:29); AV STROKES, STRIPES; NEB BLOWS; [Gk. mastigóō (Mt. 10:17); AV SCOURGE.In Prov. 17:26 Heb. nāḵâ may be rendered “flog” (cf. Dt. 25:2); like imposing a fine,
Mock
Mock [Heb hiphil of tālal (Jgs. 16:10, 13, 15), hâṯal (1 K. 18:27), piel of ḥārap̱ (2 K. 19:4, 16, 22f par Isa. 37:4, 17, 23f.; Ps. 89:51 [MT 52]), lîṣ (Prov. 19:28; 20:1), hiphil part of lāʿaḇ (2 Ch. 36:16), lāʿag̱ (2 Ch. 30:10; Job 9:23; 11:3; 21:3; Ps. 22:7 [MT 8]; 79:4; Prov. 1:26; 17:5;
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Flogging
FLOGGING Beating a person with a whip or other instrument, sometimes used as a legislated punishment. See Criminal Law and Punishment.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Mock
MOCK (Heb. qālas, to “disparage,” Hab. 1:10; “scoff,” KJV and NIV; and other Heb. and Gk. words). To ridicule, make light of, as of a fortification or an enemy.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
MOCK; MOCKER; MOCKING
MOCK; MOCKER; MOCKING<mok>, <mok’er>, <mok’-ing> (הָתַל‎ [hathal], לָעַג‎ [làagh], [ἐμπαίζω, empaizo]): To mock is the translation of [hathal], “to play upon,” “mock,” “deride” (Jdg 16:10, 13, 15; 1 Ki 18:27, “Elijah mocked them”; Job 13:9 twice, the Revised Version (British and American)
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Mockery
MOCKERY.—The Evangelists relate in the Passion history a series of narratives describing the brutal mockery of Jesus by the authorities and by their soldiers and servants. The passages are the following: (a) Mk 14:65 = Mt 26:67, 68 = Lk 22:63, 64; (b) Lk 23:11; (c) Mk 15:18–20 = Mt 27:27–31 = Jn 19:2,
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Flogging
FLOGGING Punishment by repeated lashes or blows of a whip or rod(s). The OT recognized flogging as a form of punishment (Deut. 25:1–3) though limiting it to 40 blows so that the neighbor who was punished would not be degraded. Children were disciplined with rods (Prov. 23:13–14). Floggings were sometimes
Irony
IRONY There are two basic meanings to the word “irony.” First, irony is a use of words to communicate something different from, and often opposite to, the literal meaning of the words. A famous instance of irony in this sense is when Job told his conceited know-it-all companions, “Truly then you are
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Flog
flog. To beat with a whip or rod. The term can be used to render several Hebrew and Greek words, such as nākâ H5782 (hifil, “to strike”; e.g., Deut. 25:2; Prov. 17:26) and mastigoō (e.g., Matt. 10:17; Jn. 19:1). See also crimes and punishments III.C.; scourge.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 4, M–P
Mocking
mocking. This English term and its cognates are used to render a variety of Hebrew and Greek words. Mocking may be harmless teasing, as the boy Ishmael with baby Isaac (Gen. 21:9; the Heb. verb here is ṣāḥaq H7464, a play on Issac’s name). Or it may be a lover’s complaint, as of Delilah with Samson
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Mock, Mocker, Mocking
MOCK, mok, MOCKER, mokʹẽr, MOCKING, mokʹing (הָתַל‎, hāthal, לָעַג‎, lā‛agh, ἐμπαίζω, empaízō): To mock is the tr of hāthal, “to play upon,” “mock,” “deride” (Jgs 16:10, 13, 15; 1 K 18:27, “Elijah mocked them”; Job 13:9 bis, RV “deceiveth,” “deceive,” m “mocketh,” “mock”); of lā‛agh, “to stammer”
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
FLOG
FLOG [נָכָהnakhah; δέρω derō, μαστιγόω mastigoō]. A method of punishment in which a person is beaten with a lash or flexible rod across the back. It was intended to be non-lethal. Deuteronomy 25:1–3 places a limit of no more than forty lashes in legal cases where flogging is used. This limitation
IRONY
IRONY AND SATIRE. Irony, from the Greek eirōneia (εἰρωνεία; “dissimulation”), is a literary device that exploits the difference between the literal sense and the implied sense, which are often, but not always, construed as opposites. H. W. Fowler describes irony as a way of speaking that suggests two
Key passages
Jn 19:1–3

So then Pilate took Jesus and had him flogged. And the soldiers wove a crown of thorns and placed it on his head, and put a purple robe on him, and were coming up to him and saying, “Hail, king of the Jews!” and were giving him slaps in the face.

See also
Participants
Setting
Important Things
Topics & Themes