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Jesus Christ
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
According to the New Testament, Jesus Christ is the incarnate Word of God, the Creator and Savior of the world, the founder of Christianity, and the sinless exemplar of its principles and practices. “Jesus”—His personal name—is the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew “Jeshua” (or “Joshua”). In Matthew 1:21 the name was divinely appointed, “for He will save His people from their sins.” Since the name was common in His lifetime, He was usually referred to in a more specific way, such as “Jesus of Nazareth” (John 1:26; Schaeder, “Nazarēnos, Nazōraios,” 874–79). “Christ,” the anointed one, is a title that acknowledged that He was the expected Messiah of Israel. In the Gospels, Jesus is usually identified as “the Christ.” After Peter’s sermon at Pentecost in Acts 2:38, He was usually referred to as “Jesus Christ.” This composite name joins the historic figure with the messianic role that prophetic expectation and early Christianity knew that He possessed.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ (ca. 5/4 bcad 30/33). According to the New Testament, Jesus Christ is the incarnate Word of God, the Creator and Savior of the world, the founder of Christianity, and the sinless exemplar of its principles and practices. “Jesus”—His personal name—is the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew “Jeshua” (or
Jesus in the Talmud
Jesus in the Talmud Discusses the debate over purported references to Jesus of Nazareth in classical rabbinic literature such as the Talmud.
Jesus, Canonical
Jesus, Canonical Approach to The portrayal of Jesus according to the accounts of the canonical Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John). These texts present the story of Jesus as the climax of salvation history, within the context of God’s dealings with Israel, and in support of the Christian Church’s
Jesus, Trial of
Jesus, Trial of A comparison of the two trials on the night Jesus was betrayed—one before the Sanhedrin and one before Pontius Pilate. The trials of Jesus are found in all four Gospels, which show a remarkable amount of agreement in their descriptions.
Historical Jesus, Quest for the
Jesus, Historical, Quest for Overviews the scholarly pursuit to create the best reconstruction of Jesus’ life and teachings through the use of the best readings of the most recent historical data.
Qumran and Jesus
Qumran and Jesus Explores the parallels between Jesus and the Qumran community.
Author of Life
Author of Life (ὁ ἀρχηγός τῆς ζωῆς, ho archēgos tēs zōēs). A title for Jesus that appears only once in Scripture (Acts 3:15).
Lamb of God
Lamb of God (ὁ ἀμνὸς τοῦ θεοῦ, ho amnos tou theou). A phrase John the Baptist uses in reference to Jesus of Nazareth (John 1:29, 36).
Lion of the Tribe of Judah
Lion of the Tribe of Judah (ὁ λέων ὁ ἐκ τῆς φυλῆς Ἰούδα, ho leōn ho ek tēs phylēs Iouda). A designation of the Messiah that highlights the attributes of His royal nobility (Rev 5:5).
Messiah
Messiah (מָשִׁיַח‎, mashiyach; “anointed” or “an anointed one”; “messiah”). Rendered into Greek as Χριστός (Christos), cognate to the verb χρίω (chriō, “to anoint”). In this sense, it is essentially the same to say that Jesus is the “Messiah,” or the “Christ.” In contemporary Bible translations, the former
Messiah, Critical Issues
Messiah, Critical Issues (מָשִׁיַח‎, mashiyach, Χριστός, Christos). Explores the notion of the Messiah in Christian and Jewish communities after the rise of Christianity.
Root of David
Root of David A phrase used in the New Testament to refer to Jesus Christ (Rev 5:5; 22:16). In Rev 22:16, the pairing of “descendant of David” with “root of David” indicates that “root” refers not to the ancestor of David, but to his offspring. Because David was Yahweh’s anointed king, this phrase associates
Second Adam
Second Adam Also called Last Adam or Adam Christology. A Pauline concept explaining that, by becoming human, Christ became the second Adam and began a new creation. Christ is thus contrasted with the first Adam.
Son of God, Critical Issues
Son of God (υἱός τοῦ θεοῦ, huios tou theou). A title often used of Jesus in the New Testament that has a background in Old Testament, Second Temple Jewish, and Graeco-Roman contexts.
Son of Man
Son of Man (ὁ ὑιὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου, ho huios tou anthrōpou). A phrase frequently used by Jesus to describe Himself and His ministry.
Trinity
Trinity A description of the God of Christian Scripture, revealed and understood as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; a fundamental doctrine of Christian theology.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Jesus (Person)
JESUS (PERSON) [Gk Iēsous (Ἰησους)]. Several persons mentioned in the Bible bear this name, which is a Greek form of Joshua (Heb yĕhôšûaʿ; cf. the Gk of Luke 3:29; Acts 7:45; Heb 4:8). One of these is the son of Sirach, who wrote the deuterocanonical book of Ecclesiasticus; see WISDOM OF BEN-SIRA.
Trial of Jesus
TRIAL OF JESUS. Any study of the trial of Jesus of Nazareth immediately encounters several complex issues of interpretation. For example, two gospel narratives (Matthew and Mark) present a nighttime session of the Sanhedrin, though apparently this was contrary to Jewish law. Further, all the gospels
Author of Life
AUTHOR OF LIFE [Gk archēgos zōēs (ἀρχηγος ζωης)]. In this expression (Acts 3:15), the word “author” is the rendering of archēgos in some English versions (RSV, ASV [margin], NAB, NIV). In 2 other contexts, the word is also rendered “author” in some versions: “author (of salvation)” in Heb 2:10 (ASV,
Christ
CHRIST. The word entered English from Lat Christus, which transliterates Gk christos. Outside the LXX, NT, and early Jewish and Christian writings, christos is an adjective meaning “rubbed on” or “used as an ointment or salve.” It modifies the word indicating the substance so applied, as in the expression
Messiah
MESSIAH. The term going back to Messias, a Gk form (John 1:41; 4:25) of the Heb māšı̂ah, denoting an anointed person. Hebrew hammāšı̂aḥ (Aram mĕšı̂ḥāʾ), “the Messiah,” is usually translated in Gk with ho christos, the Christ.Because a central tenet of Christianity has always been the conviction
Son of God
SON OF GOD. An honorific whose history began ca. 3000 b.c.e. In the biblical period, the title suggested a variety of ideas according to its different adaptations.A. “Son of God” in the OT1. The King2. The People of God3. The Heavenly HostsB. “Son of God” in Non-Christian Jewish Literature1. The
Son of Man
SON OF MAN [Heb ben ʾādām (בֶּן אָדָם); Aram bar ʾĕnāš (בַּר אֱנָשׁ); Gk (ho) huios (tou) anthrōpou (ὁ υἱος του ἀνθρώπου)]. A Semitic expression that typically individualizes a noun for humanity in general by prefacing it with “son of,” thus designating a specific human being, a single member
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Jesus
Jesus. 1. Name meaning “savior” or “Jehovah is salvation” given to the Messiah.See Jesus Christ, Life and Teaching of.2. kjv translation of Joshua, son of Nun, in Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8.See Joshua (Person) #1.3. Jewish Christian, surnamed Justus, who sent his greetings to the believers at Colossae
Adam, The Second
Adam, The Second. Theological term applied to Christ as head of a second race, the redeemed people of God.See Second Adam, The.
Anoint, Anointed
Anoint, Anointed. To pour oil or ointment onto a person or object in a ritualistic fashion.
Christ
Christ. Official title given to Jesus in the NT. It signifies his office as anointed Savior and alludes to his spiritual qualifications for the task of saving his people. The word derives from Greek Christos, which translates Hebrew Messiah (Jn 1:41). Both terms come from verbs meaning “to anoint with
David, Root of
David, Root of. Phrase applied to Jesus Christ in the Book of Revelation (Rv 5:5; 22:16). Though “root” usually means “source,” the metaphor depicts Jesus as David’s royal descendant, as indicated by the parallel word “offspring” in Revelation 22:16. That is, Jesus came from King David’s family as a
Lamb of God
Lamb of God. General term used by John the Baptist to show that Christ would fulfill what the OT sacrifices pointed to. John the Baptist uses the expression twice (Jn 1:29, 36), adding on the first instance, “who takes away the world’s sin!” He does not explain what the term means. In that it is not
Messiah
Messiah. Title derived from the Hebrew, mashiach, a verbal adjective meaning anointed one. Along with its NT equivalent, christos (Christ), it refers to an act of consecration whereby an individual is set apart to serve God and anointed (smeared or perhaps sprinkled) with oil. The verbal root (mashach)
Second Adam, the
Second Adam, The. Analogy that compares and contrasts the first man with the one he is seen to typify, the Lord Jesus Christ. Two essential passages develop the idea, which basically states that, while Adam’s historically-rooted sin caused horrible consequences for the human race, the perfect work of
Son of God
Son of God. Term used to express the deity of Jesus of Nazareth as the one, only begotten Son of God.Jesus’ unique sonship is antithetical to concepts of sonship popular in the ancient world. In Hellenism, people believed a man could be a “son of the gods” in many ways: in mythology, by cohabitation
Son of Man
Son of Man. Messianic title used by Jesus to express his heavenly origin, earthly mission, and glorious future coming. It does not refer merely to his human nature or humanity, as some church fathers or contemporary scholars believe. Rather, it reflects on the heavenly origin and divine dignity of Jesus,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
David, Root of
David, Root of [Gk. hē rhíza Daueid] (Rev. 5:5; 22:16); NEB SCION OF DAVID. Root here means stock, family, descendant; hence “the Root of David” is that which descended from David, not that from which David descended. Jesus Christ in His human nature and family connections was a descendant of David,
Lamb of God
Lamb of God[Gk amnós toú theoú] (Jn. 1:29, 36). This messianic title for Jesus appears only in John’s account of the ministry of John the Baptist (in Revelation “the Lamb” is always simply tó arníon).Twice John the Baptist called attention to Jesus with the words, “Behold, the Lamb of God!” (Jn.
Son of Man
Son of Man The singular indeterminate form, Heb. ben-ʾāḏām, occurs one hundred seven times in the OT (e.g., Nu. 23:19; Job 16:21; Ps. 8:4 [MT 5]; Jer. 49:18, 33; 50:40; Ezk. 2:1), often translated “man”; the phrase occurs forty-eight times in the plural, thirty-two times in the indeterminate form
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Jesus
JESUS1. Name meaning “savior” or “Jehovah [Yahweh] is salvation” given to the Messiah. See Jesus Christ.2. kjv translation of Joshua, son of Nun, in Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8. See Joshua (Person) #1.3. Jewish Christian, surnamed Justus, who sent his greetings to the believers at Colosse in the salutation
Jesus Christ
JESUS CHRIST Messiah, Savior, and founder of the Christian church.In providing a biography of Jesus Christ it must be borne in mind that each of the Gospels has its own distinctive purpose. Matthew, for instance, presents Jesus as the messianic King, whereas the emphasis in Mark is more on Jesus as
Spirit of Jesus Christ
SPIRIT OF JESUS CHRIST The Spirit as identified with Jesus Christ.The most important development and element in earliest Christian understanding of the Spirit is that the Spirit is now the Spirit of Jesus Christ (Acts 16:7; Rom 8:9; Gal 4:6; Phil 1:19; 1 Pt 1:11; see also Jn 7:38; 15:26; 16:7; 19:30;
Adam, the Second
ADAM*, THE SECOND Analogy that compares and contrasts the first man with the one he is seen to typify, the Lord Jesus Christ. Two essential passages develop the idea, which basically states that, while Adam’s historically rooted sin caused horrible consequences for the human race, the perfect work of
Anointed One, Anointed Ones
ANOINTED ONE, ANOINTED ONES In the NT, Jesus Christ is portrayed as fulfilling the three offices of prophet, priest, and king. He is, supremely, God’s Anointed One. “Messiah” is the term for “anointed one” derived directly from the Hebrew word for anointed; “Christ” is the same title derived from the
Christ
CHRIST Official title given to Jesus in the NT. It signifies his office as anointed Savior and alludes to his spiritual qualifications for the task of saving his people. The word derives from Greek Christos, which translates Hebrew Messiah (Jn 1:41). Both terms come from verbs meaning “to anoint with
David, Root of
DAVID*, ROOT OF Phrase applied to Jesus Christ in the book of Revelation (Rv 5:5; 22:16). Though “root” usually means “source,” the metaphor depicts Jesus as David’s royal descendant, as indicated by the parallel word “offspring” in Revelation 22:16. That is, Jesus came from King David’s family as a
Lamb of God
LAMB OF GOD General term used twice by John the Baptist (Jn 1:29, 36), adding on the first instance “who takes away the world’s sin!” He does not explain what the term means. Christians use the term freely, but what do they mean by it? Why would anyone be called “God’s Lamb”?Some maintain that John
Lion of the Tribe of Judah
LION OF THE TRIBE OF JUDAH A title of the Messiah that appears only in Revelation 5:5: “the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the heir to David’s throne, has conquered” (nlt). This is an allusion to the messianic promise of Genesis 49:9–10, “Judah is a young lion.… The scepter will not depart from Judah” (nlt).
Messiah
MESSIAH Title derived from the Hebrew, mashiach, a verbal adjective meaning “anointed one.” Along with its NT equivalent, christos (Christ), it refers to an act of consecration whereby an individual is set apart to serve God and then anointed with oil. The verbal root (mashach) conveys this idea as well.
Son of God
SON OF GOD Term used to express the deity of Jesus of Nazareth as the unique divine Son.Jesus’ unique sonship is antithetical to concepts of sonship popular in the ancient world. In Hellenism, people believed a man could be a “son of the gods” in many ways: in mythology, by cohabitation of a god with
Son of Man
SON OF MAN Messianic title used by Jesus to express his heavenly origin, earthly mission, and glorious future coming. It does not refer merely to his human nature or humanity, as some church fathers or contemporary scholars believe. Rather, it reflects on the heavenly origin and divine dignity of Jesus,
Trinity
TRINITY* Term designating the three members of the triune God: the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.The word “Trinity” does not appear in the Bible; it was created by scholars to describe the three members of the Godhead. Throughout the Bible, God is presented as being Father, Son, and Spirit—not three
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Jesus Christ
Jesus Christjesus christ is the central figure of the nt: every book is written because of him and, in some sense, about him. Within the nt itself, he is spoken of in two distinct ways.(1) The nt describes and reflects upon a man named Jesus who lived in Galilee and was eventually crucified in Jerusalem;
Trial of Jesus
trial of Jesus. All four nt Gospels report that Jesus appeared before the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate for a hearing that resulted in a sentence of death by crucifixion (Matt. 27:11–14; Mark 15:2–5; Luke 23:17–25; John 18:28–38).Before Pilate: The basic outline of the trial before Pilate suits known
Holy One of Israel, The
Holy One of Israel, the, a term for God. In the Bible the phrase is used frequently by the Hebrew prophets, especially Isaiah, as a title for Israel’s God (Isa. 1:4; 5:19, 24; 10:17, 20; 40:25; 41:14, 16, 20; 43:3, 14–15). The phrase also appears in the Psalms (71:22; 78:41; 89:18). In the nt, “Holy
Lamb of God
Lamb of God, the title with which John the Baptist twice greets Jesus at the beginning of the Gospel of John (1:29, 35). In Revelation, the lamb also appears a number of times as a symbol for Christ, although a different Greek word is used in Revelation (arnion) than is found in John’s Gospel (amnos).
Messiah
messiah (muh-si´uh; from Heb. mashiakh, “anointed one”), an anointed agent of God appointed to a task affecting the lot of God’s elect.Early Usage: Though the Hebrew verb mashakh was often used of the anointing of men as kings over Israel (e.g., Saul, 1 Sam. 9:16; David, 2 Sam. 2:4, 7; Ps. 89:20; Solomon,
Son of God, Son of God
son of God, Son of God, a person with a special relationship to God, often with a special role in salvation history. When used in the plural, the term carries a very different sense. See sons of God, children of God.In the Hebrew Bible: In pre-Christian Judaism there are three notable uses of the term
Son of Man, Son of Man
son of man, Son of Man.1 An idiomatic way of speaking of a human being, or of humanity collectively. The Hebrew phrase is ben ’adam, which the nrsv often translates as “mortal(s).” Sometimes, the phrase ben ’adam is used in synonymous parallelism with “human being,” as when the psalmist asks, “What
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Jesus Christ
JESUS CHRIST. Jesus Christ is unique in several respects, not the least of which is the fact that in Him alone centers the gospel of the grace of God. He has changed the face of history, for in Him eternity has invaded time, God has become man, and human life has achieved through His redemption a significance
Christ, Deity of
CHRIST, DEITY OF. Jesus Christ is the son of God and very God of very God. He is of the same substance with the Father and the Holy Spirit, and equal in power and glory (see God-head). Everything, therefore, that can be said of the Father and of the Holy Sprit can be said of the Son. He is the Creator
Lamb of God
LAMB OF GOD. Three Gr. Words in the NT are translated “lamb”: amnos, “lamb” (Jn 1:29, 36; Acts 8:32; 1 Pet 1:19); arnos, “lamb” once (Lk 10:3); arnion, “little lamb” (Jn 21:15; Rev 5:6, 8 etc.)Lambs and young rams formed an important part of OT sacrifices (Num 6:14; Lev 4:32). See Sacrifice. A study
Messiah
MESSIAH. The word “Messiah” as a transliteration of the Heb. word māshı̂ach comes through the Aram. māshı̂chā and the Gr. messías. Its Heb. source is found in the verb māshach; “to anoint,” and is most often translated in English versions as “the anointed.” In the KJV “Messiah” as a transliteration
Son of Man
SON OF MAN. A translation of the Aram. bar˒enās and the Gr. huios tu anthrōpou. The expression has various meanings in Scripture depending on the context. In Ps 8:4 it means “man” generally; in Ezk 2:1 it emphasizes the difference between the human prophet and the Lord who speaks to and through him;
Sonship of Christ
SONSHIP OF CHRIST. Three main views have been presented of the sonship of Christ.1. Creation in time past. This was the view of Arius as he argued that Jesus Christ was created in time past in the likeness of God the Father and is homoiousios with Him. It was rejected at the Council of Nicea because
Trinity
TRINITY. The early church, opposing polytheism with the OT teaching that there is only one God, was soon forced to ask, Who is Jesus Christ? Was He a mere man? Is He an angel? Or is He God? And if He is God, are there two Gods?Near the beginning of the 4th cen. strong party in the church, under the
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Trial of Jesus
TRIAL OF JESUS. The arrest of our Lord in the garden is followed, in the Synoptic tradition, by his removal to a meeting of the Jewish leaders (Mk. 14:53). Jn. 18:12–13 preserves an independent account of a preliminary examination before Annas, the father-in-law of the high priest Caiaphas. There follows
Anointing, Anointed
ANOINTING, ANOINTED. Persons and things were anointed, in the OT, to signify holiness, or separation unto God: pillars (cf. Gn. 28:18); the tabernacle and its furniture (Ex. 30:22ff.); shields (2 Sa. 1:21; Is. 21:5: probably to consecrate them for the ‘holy war’, see Dt. 23:9ff.); kings (Jdg. 9:8; 2
Lamb of God
LAMB OF GOD. This expression occurs twice only in the NT (Jn. 1:29, 36). The word amnos is also found in Acts 8:32 and 1 Pet. 1:19, arnos occurs in Lk. 10:3, and arnion is found once in Jn. 21:15 and twenty-eight times in Revelation. The words ‘Behold the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world’ (Jn.
Lion of Judah
LION OF JUDAH. An abbreviated form of one of Christ’s Messianic titles found in Rev. 5:5, ‘the Lion of the tribe of Judah’. An obvious allusion to Gn. 49:9, ‘Judah is a lion’s whelp’, this title depicts Christ as the culmination of the courage, might and ferocity of the tribe of Judah. Like a lion Satan
Trinity
TRINITY. The term ‘Trinity’ is not itself found in the Bible. It was first used by Tertullian at the close of the 2nd century, but received wide currency and formal elucidation only in the 4th and 5th centuries. Three affirmations are central to the historic doctrine of the Trinity: 1. there is but one
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Jesus
Jesus (Gk. Iēsoús)Greek form of the name Joshua (Heb. yĕhôšûaʿ, “Yahweh will save”); cf. Luke 3:29; Acts 7:45; Heb. 4:8.1. The father of Sirach and grandfather of the author of the book of Sirach (Ecclesiasticus; Sir. Prologue).2. Joshua ben Sira (“Jesus son of Sirach”), author of Sirach/Ecclesiasticus.
Jesus Christ
Jesus ChristThe founder of what became the Christian movement. For greater specificity, in his lifetime he was called “Jesus son of Joseph” (Luke 4:22; John 1:45; 6:42), “Jesus of Nazareth” (Acts 10:38), or “Jesus the Nazarene” (Mark 1:24; Luke 24:19 [some translations do not distinguish “the Nazarene”
Christ
ChristGk. Christós, lit., “the Anointed One,” a translation of Heb. /Aram. “the Messiah.” The term is related to the verb “to anoint, to smear.” As with its Hebrew counterpart, “Christ” can be used adjectivally (“the anointed priest”; e.g., Lev. 4:5, 16) but is most common as a noun. As a title, “the
Holy One of Israel
Holy One of IsraelA title for Yahweh that appears primarily in Isaiah. The name emphasizes the elements of God’s moral holiness and special relationship with the entire people of Israel. The title probably arose in the cultus, which emphasized God’s holiness, as the theme of the Holiness Code shows:
Messiah
MessiahThe word “Messiah” is an adjectival form with a passive sense derived from the Hebrew verb meaning “to anoint.” It can be used adjectivally (“the anointed priest”; Lev. 4:3), though its most common form is nominal (Heb. māšɩ̂aḥ). In the 30 occurrences of the term in the OT, there is no single
Second Man
Second ManA term Paul applies to Christ in view of his being the first to be resurrected and, therefore, a second beginning (after Adam, “the first man”) of the human race (1 Cor. 15:47; Gk. ho deúteros ánthrōpos).
Son of God
Son of GodA person or people having a close relationship with God; in the NT a designation of Jesus. The Lord promised through Nathan that David’s ancestor would be “a son to me” (2 Sam. 7:14; 1 Chr. 17:13; 22:10; 28:6), and other texts call the king the Lord’s son (Ps. 2:7; cf. Isa. 9:6–7 [MT 5–6])
Son of Man
Son of ManA title derived from a Hebrew (ben ʾāḏām) and Aramaic (bar ʾĕnāš) idiom which designates a collective (humanity) or an individual within the collective (human being). Its use as a self-designation for Jesus in the four Gospels and uncertainty about whether it is a christological title
Trinity
TrinityThe distinctive Christian understanding that the creator God disclosed in history as the God of Israel and the God and Father of Jesus Christ is tri-personal. This distinctive trinitarian understanding has been maintained, on the one hand, against modalism which asserts that the one God has disclosed
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Jesus
Jesus [jēˊsəs] (Gk. Iēsous; from Heb. yehôšua˓ “Yahweh will save”).
Christ
Christ (Gk. Christos). “Christ” is the New Testament designation of Old Testament “Messiah” (Heb. māšîaḥ “anointed”). Frequently the RSV (like the NIV and JB; KJV less often) renders Gk. ho Christos of the Gospels as “the Christ,” meaning that Jesus is the only true Christ (e.g., John
Holy One of Israel
Holy One of Israel (Heb. qeḏôš yiśrā˒ēl). A name of God which represents not only his separateness and uniqueness but also his special relationship to the people Israel (cf. Exod. 19:6; Lev. 19:2). It occurs primarily in the book of Isaiah (twenty-five times; e.g., Isa. 1:4; 43:3; 60:9) and
Messiah
Messiah [mə sīˊə] (Gk. Messías; from Heb. māšîaḥ “anointed [one]”).† God’s anointed king; in the Old Testament specifically the expected Jewish Messiah, in the New Testament Jesus Christ.In its basic sense the term “messiah” refers to a person who has been consecrated to a high office by
Second Man, The
Second Man, The (Gk. ho deúteros ánthrōpos).* A term Paul applies to Christ in view of his being the first to be resurrected and, therefore, a second beginning (after Adam, “the first man”) of the human race (1 Cor. 15:47). See Adam III.
Son of God
Son of God (Gk. huiós toú theoú). One who shares a close relationship with God; in the New Testament a designation of Jesus.“Son of God” was a royal title that made its way from Egypt and the East into the Hellenistic kingdoms and the Roman Empire (e.g., Alexander the Great was called “son of Ammon”
Son of Man
Son of Man (Gk. ho huiós toú anthrṓpou).† Jesus’ favorite self-designation in the Synoptic Gospels. The appellative arises from Heb. ben-˒āḏām and Aram. bar ˒enāš “son of man,” a Semitic idiom for an individual human being or for mankind in general, particularly as distinguished from
Trinity
Trinity (from Lat. trinitas).† An expression for the revelation of the one God (Deut. 6:4) in three “persons,” Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The doctrine of the trinity is a theoretical model intended to systematize various expressions in the Bible. The basis in Scripture on which it was built can
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Jesus
JESUS ἸησοῦςI. Iēsous is the Greek form of the Hebrew personal name yĕhōšūʿa stamped after its postexilic variant yēšūʿa. The votive name means “Yahweh is help (salvation)” as rightly interpreted by Philo, Mut. 121. It is derived from the root yšʿ, frequent in other Hebrew and Semitic personal
Christ
CHRIST χριστὀςI. The masculine form of the adjective χριστὀς is only found in the LXX, in a few early Jewish documents and in the writings of the NT. In the LXX the term is used in connection with kings, priests and prophets (the Hebrew equivalent is māšîaḥ), in Pss. Sol. 17:32; 18 superscr.,
Holy One
HOLY ONE קדושׁI. The Hebrew root qdš indicates ‘to be reserved for a god, to be sacred’ and is frequently used in the Hebrew Bible. A number of nominative forms are derived from this root: qādēš ‘prostitute’ and qōdeš ‘sacred object, sacred place, holiness’. The adjective qādôš, ‘the Holy One’,
Son of God
SON OF GODI. The title ‘Son of God’, ascribed to Jesus in the NT, reflects a common ancient Near Eastern notion according to which the king could claim divine descent. The idea is also found in the OT. In relation to Jesus, the title eventually became associated with such concepts as divinity and preexistence.
Son of Man
SON OF MAN בן אדם‎, בר אנשׁ‎, ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπουI. Son of man is a typical Semitic expression (‘son of …’= one of the species of) denoting an individual human being (Ps 8:4; Job 16:21). Paradoxically it comes to refer, in Jewish texts, to a heavenly figure who looks like a human being and, in New
Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels
Trial of Jesus
Trial of jesusThe trial and death* of Jesus, in addition to being a celebrated problem of jurisprudence, is the focal point of the gospel story and thus assumes paramount importance as a historical and theological issue. Opinions are sharply divided over a wide range of historical, literary and legal
Christ
ChristThe Greek word translated “christ” (christos) appears 531 times in the NT (Nestle-Aland 26th ed.), and “Christ” is one of the most familiar terms by which Jesus is known, both in the NT and in subsequent Christian tradition. All the canonical Gospels (see Canon) apply the term to Jesus, but
Lamb of God
Lamb of godThe phrase “Lamb of God” is found in the NT only in the Gospel of John. There are two occurrences, the first in John 1:29 where John the Baptist (see John the Baptist) is reported as saying of Jesus: “Look, the Lamb of God (ho amnos tou theou), who takes away the sin of the world” and
Son of God
Son of godThis is arguably the most significant christological title in the NT. “Son of God” or its equivalents (“the Son,” “my Son,” etc.) occur more than 124 times in the NT, and may be the foremost christological category in each of the Gospels. The NT characteristically describes Jesus’ relationship
Son of Man
Son of manThe person whose name was Jesus (perhaps more closely defined as “Jesus of Nazareth” or as “Jesus the son of Joseph” [Jn 1:46; 6:42] to make clear which holder of the name was meant) is known by various forms of words in the Gospels and the NT generally. To some extent these forms of words