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Jerome
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A church father and biblical scholar who produced numerous commentaries and homilies on Scripture, historical treatises, theological essays, a vast correspondence, and other miscellaneous works. He is most noted for his translation of the Bible into Latin, later known as the Vulgate.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Jerome
Jerome (ca. 347–419/420). A church father and biblical scholar who produced numerous commentaries and homilies on Scripture, historical treatises, theological essays, a vast correspondence, and other miscellaneous works. He is most noted for his translation of the Bible into Latin, later known as the
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Jerome
JeromeTranslator of the Vulgate, a Latin translation of the Bible based on Hebrew texts of the OT and the oldest Greek texts of the NT available at the time. It was the standard Bible for Western Christendom. Commissioned by Pope Damasus I, Jerome labored upon this, his most important translation project,
Hieronymus
Hieronymus (Gk. Hierōnymos; Lat. Hieronymus)1. A district governor at the time of Antiochus V Eupator who antagonized the Jews (2 Macc. 12:2).2. Latin form of Jerome, translator of the Vulgate.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Jerome
Jerome [jə rōmˊ].† Eusebius Hieronymus (A.D. 342–420), a scholar and monk known most for the Latin Vulgate translation of the Bible. Yet although the Vulgate is normally associated with Jerome’s name, he was not its only translator/reviser. Pope Damasus commissioned Jerome in 382 to produce a standard
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Jerome
Jerome. Eng. form of Lat. ‘Hieronymus’. The form ‘Hierome’ is sometimes found in older (e.g. 17th-cent.) English.
The Dictionary of Historical Theology
Jerome (c. 347–420)
Jerome (c. 347–420)Jerome was born in Stridon in Dalmatia, the son of prosperous Christian parents. He was educated at Rome, where he was baptized. While spending some time in Trier and Aquileia in his early twenties he developed an interest in the monastic life and decided to move to Syria, where he
The Westminster Dictionary of Theologians
Jerome
Jerome (347–419). One of the most distinguished Christian authors of antiquity, famous above all for his translation of the Bible into Latin, known as the Vulgate. A native of Panonia, as a young man he went to Rome to study. There he was baptized by Bishop ⇒Liberius. Then he traveled through the Levant,
The Thiselton Companion to Christian Theology
Jerome
JeromeJerome (c. 345–420) first studied at Rome, and traveled in Gaul, before he entered the ascetic life and became a biblical exegete. In 374, at about thirty, he traveled to Palestine via Antioch, and then settled in the Syrian desert, where he learned Hebrew. By 385 he had returned to Rome as secretary
131 Christians Everyone Should Know
Jerome
Scholars and ScientistsJeromeBible translator whose version lasted a millennium“Make knowledge of the Scripture your love.… Live with them, meditate on them, make them the sole object of your knowledge and inquiries.”Eusebius Hieronymus Sophronius, thankfully known as Jerome, was probably
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Jerome
Jerome.—Eusebius Hieronymus Sophronius, the son of Eusebius, a Christian, was born at Stridon in Dalmatia, as some say about the year a.d. 329, but, as seems more probable, about the year 346, and he died at Bethlehem on Sept. 30, a.d. 420. He was sent to Rome at the age of eighteen, and after a residence
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Jerome
Jerome juh-rohm’. Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus was born of Christian parents about A.D. 345 (according to some, 330) in Strido, a town in Dalmatia, near the border with Italy and not far from the N coast of the Adriatic Sea. He studied literature and rhetoric in Rome, traveled in Gaul, and settled
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Jerome
Jerome (ca. 347–419). A biblical scholar and translator who aimed to introduce the best of Greek learning to Western Christianity. He sensed the West’s inferiority, and he labored to add scholarship to the church’s public glory.Jerome, whose Latin name was Eusebius Hieronymus, was born in the little
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
JEROME
JEROME juh-rohm´. Jerome (ca. 340–420 ce) was born at Stridon (now in Croatia) into a Christian family and educated in classical letters and rhetoric at Rome. After conversion to an ascetic life, ordination at Antioch, residence at Rome, and some traveling in the holy lands, he settled in Bethlehem and