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Ivory
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ivory
Ivory (שֵׁן‎, shen). A material derived from the tusks and teeth of elephants and hippopotamuses that ancient artisans fashioned into luxury tools and decorative items, including furniture inlays.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ivory
IVORY. Ivory was used in the ANE primarily as a medium for sculpture from Chalcolithic times until the close of the biblical period. Since this study was prepared for a biblical dictionary, it is not intended as a comprehensive treatment of ivory-working in the ancient world, but rather as a discussion
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Ivory
Ivory. Opaque dentine substance, often mentioned along with precious metals and gems in the Bible and ancient Near Eastern writings. As such, ivory was used for combs, small boxes, jars, and other cosmetic articles, for figurines and amulets, for games, and for the adornment of articles of furniture,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ivory
Ivory[Heb šēn] (1 K. 10:18; 22:39; 2 Ch. 9:17; Ps. 45:8 [MT 9]; Cant. 5:14; 7:4 [MT 5]; Ezk. 27:6, 15; Am. 3:15; 6:4); NEB also “strong” (Ezk. 27:6); [šenhabbîm] (1 K. 10:22; 2 Ch. 9:21); [Gk. elephántinos] (Rev. 18:12). The Hebrew term šēn is a specialized use of the common noun for tooth. This
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ivory
IVORY Opaque dentine substance, often mentioned along with precious metals and gems in the Bible and ancient Near Eastern writings. As such, ivory was used for combs, small boxes, jars, and other cosmetic articles; for figurines and amulets; for games; and for the adornment of articles of furniture,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ivory
ivory, a costly material in ancient times, derived from the tusks of elephants (or sometimes hippopotami) and used for jewelry and various other luxury items. The Hebrew name, shen, means “tooth.” Ivory is mentioned a number of times in the Bible. Solomon’s fleet of ships, on its three-year voyages,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ivory
Small ivory panel with an Egyptian scene from an Assyrian palace at Nimrud, Assyria. BMIVORY. The Heb. word shēn, translated “ivory,” means “tooth”; and the compound word shenhabbɩ̂m, also translated “ivory,” means “elephant’s tooth.” See Animals: Elephant, II, 12.Ivory is mentioned several times
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ivory
IVORY (Heb. šēn, ‘tooth’, or šenhabbîm (1 Ki. 10:22; 2 Ch. 9:21) thought by some to be ‘tooth of elephant’ (so lxx), but possibly meaning ‘ivory (and) ebony’ as in Ezk. 27:15; cf. Akkad. šin piri).Ivory was a form of wealth and a mark of luxurious and fine goods (1 Ki. 10:18–22; Rev. 18:12, Gk.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ivory
IvoryA luxury good used in a variety of ways beginning in the Chalcolithic period and continuing throughout the biblical period. The use of ivory in the Levant is especially well attested in the Late Bronze II (1350–1200 b.c.) and Iron II periods (9th–8th century). The Hebrew term (šēn) means “tooth,”
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ivory
Ivory (Heb. šēn “tooth,” šenhabbîm, perhaps “tooth (i.e., tusk) of elephant”; Gk. elephántinos).†In the Bible as throughout the ancient world, raw ivory and ivory carvings were a token of wealth and luxury (cf. Amos 6:4), to be traded (Ezek. 27:15; Rev. 18:12), treasured, and demanded in
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Ivory
IVORY The earliest recorded use of ivory is in the Neolithic period in Egypt, where harpoons made of ivory were found. In the early pre-dynastic period ivory was used for making figurines, jewelry and arrowheads. The tusks of hippopotami were used as well as those of elephants, though the early use of
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ivory
IVORY A precious commodity in the ancient world, as today, that was used throughout Palestine and the ancient Near East for sculpture and ornamentation. Its applications were as varied as the imaginations of craftsmen; it was used in chairs, tables, and beds, as well as smaller personal items such as