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Iota
Dot • Jot • Jot and Tittle • Jot or Tittle • Stroke • Tittle
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Jot or Tittle
Jot or Tittle. Expression Jesus used in the Sermon on the Mount. In Matthew 5:18 jot (kjv) is a transliteration of the Greek letter iota (rsv). In this context it originally referred to the Hebrew letter yod, the smallest letter in the Hebrew alphabet. Tittle is a Middle English word referring to the
Tittle
Tittle. Tiny ornamental “horn” on certain Hebrew letters.See Jot or Tittle.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Iota
Iota ī-ōt́ə [Gk. iṓta] (Mt. 5:18); AV JOT; NEB LETTER. The English transliteration of the Gk. iṓta (ι), the ninth (originally the tenth) letter of the Greek alphabet. Iṓta is the nearest equivalent of the Heb. yōḏ (י), the tenth letter of the Hebrew alphabet. The Dot also mentioned here (Gk.
Dot
Dot [Gk. keraía] (Mt. 5:18; Lk. 16:17); AV TITTLE; NEB STROKE. A minute stroke or mark. The Greek means literally “horn” or “projection” as part of a letter. It could designate a distinguishing mark, e.g., an accent, a diacritical mark, or a breathing mark; or it could denote an ornamentation. In both
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Jot or Tittle
JOT OR TITTLE* An expression Jesus used in the Sermon on the Mount. In Matthew 5:18 jot is a transliteration of the Greek letter iota. In this context it originally referred to the Hebrew letter yod, the smallest letter in the Hebrew alphabet. Tittle is a Middle English word referring to the diacritical
Tittle
TITTLE* Tiny ornamental “horn” on certain Hebrew letters. See Jot or Tittle.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Iota
iota (i-oh´tuh), ninth (and smallest) letter in the Greek alphabet, frequently equivalent to the English letter i. It is mentioned in Matt. 5:18 as a symbol of a very minor matter in the law; Jesus declares that not one iota will pass from the law until all is accomplished. The nrsv translates the word
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Jot
JOT. A word used in Mt 5:18 to represent the Gr. iōta, a letter equivalent to i in English. However, iōta was used here to designate yōd, the smallest letter in the Heb. alphabet, and thereby to set forth the indestructibility of the law in its smallest details. The inviolability of all of God’s revelation
Tittle
TITTLE. In the nuance of Mt 5:18 and Lk 16:17 the Gr. term keraia, “little horn,” means a small stroke, crown, or hook which serves as an ornament to some letters of the Heb. alphabet, a serif. In rabbinical sources it is designated as “thorn” (qôṣ, qôṣâ), “crown” (keter), andpoint” (nqûdâ).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Jot and Tittle
JOT AND TITTLE. In Mt. 5:18 (av) ‘jot’ is a transliteration of iōta (rsv), the name of the Gk. i; here, however, it stands for the corresponding Heb. yôḏ, the smallest letter of the alphabet, the use of which is frequently optional. ‘Tittle’ is a variant spelling for ‘title’, which in older Eng.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Iota
Iota (Gk. îta)The ninth letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding to Eng. i and Heb. yodh. At Matt. 5:18 it is noted as the smallest letter in the contemporary Hebrew and Aramaic script (KJV “jot”).
Dot
DotA minute detail of the law, cited by Jesus to emphasize the permanence and value of the OT law (Matt. 5:18; Luke 16:17). Matthew mentions it with the iota, the name for the smallest letter of the Greek alphabet. Gk. keraɩ́a, “dot” (“apex of a letter”), refers to small parts of a letter (NRSV “stroke
Tittle
TittleKJV rendering of Gk. keraɩ́a, a small stroke or hook that probably served to distinguish otherwise similar Hebrew letters (Matt. 5:18; Luke 16:17).See Dot.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Iota
Iota [ī ōˊtə] (Gk. iṓta). The ninth letter of the Greek alphabet, corresponding to Eng. i and Heb. yodh. Its numerical value is ten. At Matt. 5:18 it is noted as the smallest letter in the contemporary Hebrew and Aramaic script (KJV “jot”; JB “dot”).
Dot
Dot (Gk. keraía).* A minute detail of the law, cited by Jesus to emphasize the permanence and value of the Old Testament law (Matt. 5:18). Matthew mentions it with the iota, the name for the smallest letter of the Greek alphabet. The Greek term for “dot” (“apex of a letter”) refers to small parts
Tittle
Tittle. The KJV rendering of Gk. keraía, a term for a small stroke or hook that probably served to distinguish otherwise similar Hebrew letters (Matt. 5:18; Luke 16:17). See Dot.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Iota
IOTA The ninth letter of the Greek alphabet (ι), corresponding to the English letter i. It is the smallest mark in the Greek alphabet; in Matthew 5:18, Jesus says that “not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the law,” meaning that not even the smallest letter of the Torah would pass away until its fulfillment
Jot
JOT An archaic English transliteration of the Greek iota in Matt 5:18, used in the Douay and King James versions (see Versions of the Bible). The RSV renders it more literally as “iota”: “For truly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the law until all
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
iota
iota. The Greek letter ι (corresponding to the Hebrew yod both in sound and as being the smallest letter of the alphabet), mentioned in Christ’s saying that ‘one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass away from the law’ (Mt. 5:18). The English ‘jot’, a transliteration of this Greek word (ἰῶτα), derives
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Jot
Jot, the English form of the Greek iota, i.e., the smallest letter of the Greek alphabet. The Hebrew is yod, or y formed like an apostrophe (’). It is used metaphorically to express the minutest thing.
Key passages
Mt 5:18

For truly I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not one tiny letter or one stroke of a letter will pass away from the law until all takes place.