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Inquire
Enquire • Follow-Up • Inquiry • Inquisition
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Inquire
Inquire[Heb dāraš (1 K. 22:5; Am. 5:14; etc.), šāʾal (1 S. 10:22; etc.), bāqar (Lev. 27:33; 2 K. 16:15), bāʿâ (Isa. 21:12), bāqaš (Est. 2:23; Ps. 27:4; Dnl. 1:20); Gk. pynthánomai (Jn. 4:54; etc.), zētéō (Acts 9:11), ereunaō, exereunaō (1 Pet. 1:10f)]; INQUIRY [Heb. biqqōreṯ (Lev. 19:20),
Enquire
Enquire This is an Old English word, now obsolescent, common in the AV. In the RSV it is usually replaced by the more modern “inquire.” See Inquire.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Inquisition, the
Inquisition, the. ‘Inquisition’ (Lat. inquisitio) means a legal inquiry, but in the later Middle Ages the term was used to describe a special ecclesiastical tribunal concerned with the detection and prosecution of heresy. In early times the usual punishment for heresy was *excommunication. The Fathers
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
INQUIRE
INQUIRE<in-kwir’> ([שָׁאַל‎, sha’al], “to ask,” “desire”; [ζητέω, zeteo], “to seek”); A form sometimes employed with reference to the practice of divination, as where Saul “inquires of” (or “consults”) the witch of Endor as to the issue of the coming battle (1 Sam 28:6, 7) (see DIVINATION).
ENQUIRE
ENQUIRE<en-kwir’>: This is an Old English word now obsolescent. It is common in the King James Version. In the American Standard Revised Version it is nearly always replaced by the more modern “inquire,” a few times by “seek” and “ask,” once by “salute” (1 Chronicles 18:10). With this one
INQUISITION
INQUISITION<in-kwi-zish’-un> ([דָּרַשׁ‎, darash], “to follow,” “diligently inquire,” “question,” “search” (Dt 19:18; Ps 9:12), [בָּקַשׁ‎, baqash], “to search out,” “to strive after,” “inquire” (Est 2:23)): The term refers, as indicated by these passages, first of all to a careful and
A Catholic Dictionary
Inquisition
inquisition. In no age of Christianity has the Church had any doubt that in her hands, and only in hers, was the deposit of the true faith and religion placed by Jesus Christ, and that, as it is her duty to teach this to all nations, so she is bound by all practicable and lawful means to restrain the
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Auto Da Fe
Auto Da Fe (Act of Faith).—Name given to the ceremony that took place when the Inquisition had rendered its judgment on the person brought before it for trial. It was especially applied to the execution of the judgment by fire. See Inquisition.
Inquisition
Inquisition (The) called also Holy Office, a tribunal in the Catholic Church for the discovery and repression of heresy, unbelief, and other offenses against religion. From the very first establishment of Christianity as the religion of the Roman empire, laws, more or less severe, existed, as in most
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Inquisition
Inquisition“Roman Catholic institution for investigation and punishment of those who hold erroneous doctrines. Although John Chrystostom had stated that ‘to put a heretic to death would be to introduce upon earth an inexpiable crime,’ Catholic bishops began in the Middle Ages to use the power of civil
Spanish Inquisition
Spanish InquisitionBaker’s Pocket Dictionary of Religious Terms describes it thus: “Special investigation (1478–1820) of heresy in Spain and Spanish America. Never completely approved by the papal office, and sometimes acting in defiance of the pope, it suppressed with unusual cruelty and severity heretics,
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Inquire
inquire. To seek information, especially to consult God with regard to his will. Various terms meaning “to ask,” “to search,” and the like may be used in this connection (such as Heb. bāqaš H1335 piel, Exod. 33:7 et al.; dāraš H2011, Gen. 25:22; šāʾal H8626 [with the preposition bĕ-], Jdg. 18:5
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Inquire
INQUIRE, in-kwīrʹ (שָׁאַל‎, shā’al, “to ask,” “desire”; ζητέω, zētḗō, “to seek”); A form sometimes employed with reference to the practice of divination, as where Saul “inquires of” (or “consults”) the witch of Endor as to the issue of the coming battle (1 S 28:6, 7) (see Divination).In Job 10:6,
Enquire
ENQUIRE, en-kwīrʹ: This is an OE word now obsolescent. It is common in AV. In ARV it is nearly always replaced by the more modern “inquire,” a few times by “seek” and “ask,” once by “salute” (1 Ch 18:10). With this one exception in the OT the change does not affect the meaning. In Acts 23:15, “enquire
Inquisition
INQUISITION, in-kwi-zishʹun (דָּרַשׁ‎, dārash, “to follow,” “diligently inquire,” “question,” “search” [Dt 19:18; Ps 9:12], בָּקַשׁ‎, bāḳash, “to search out,” “to strive after,” “inquire” [Est 2:23]): The term refers, as indicated by these passages, first of all to a careful and diligent inquiry necessary