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Inner Being
Inmost Self • Inner Man • Inner Nature • Inward Man
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Inner Man
Inner Man. This Pauline phrase resembles the “hidden man” of 1 Peter 3:4 (cf. Rom 2:29), where outward appearance is contrasted with inward reality. It assumes the current Jewish conception of man as a unitary being having both observable and invisible aspects, a physical body including a “psychological”
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Inner Man; Inner Nature; Inmost Self
Inner Man; Inner Nature; Inmost Self[Gk ho ésō ánthrōpos]. An expression used by Paul (Rom. 7:22; 2 Cor. 4:16; Eph. 3:16) for the true self in contrast with the “outward self” (ho éxō ánthrōpos, 2 Cor. 4:16) that is visible to others, and the outward “members” that are subject to the law of
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Inner Man
INNER MAN* The inner, invisible being of a human. This Pauline phrase resembles the “hidden man” (kjv) of 1 Peter 3:4 (cf. Rom 2:29), where outward appearance is contrasted with inward reality. It assumes the current Jewish conception of man as a unitary being having both observable and invisible aspects,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Inner Man
INNER MAN. Inner or inward man is the KJV translation of ho esō anthrōpos, in Rom 7:22; Eph 3:16; 2 Cor 4:16 (in last reference only ho esō appears, with ạnthrōos clearly to be supplied from the immediate context). It is a Pauline expression referring to man’s rational, moral and spiritual nature,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Inner Man
INNER MAN. Paul uses this phrase (ho esō anthrōpos, in Rom. 7:22; 2 Cor. 4:16; Eph. 3:16) to denote the Christian’s true self, as seen by God and known (partially) in consciousness. (For a vindication of the view that Rom. 7:14–25 pictures Paul the Christian, see A. Nygren, Romans, 1952, pp. 284ff.)
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Inner Being
Inner BeingAn expression (Gk. ho ésō ánthrōpos) used by Paul (Eph. 3:16) apparently to describe the spiritual self, which experiences constant renewal under the guidance of God’s love and mercy, as opposed to the “outer man,” which is subject to sin. Such a conclusion can only be reached, however,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Inner Man
Inner Man (Gk. ho ésō ánthrōpos). An expression used by Paul at Eph. 3:16 (cf. “inmost self” [Gk. noús; Rom. 7:22] and “inner nature” [2 Cor. 4:16]) to distinguish the spiritual self, which only God can see, from the “outer man,” whom others see and who is subject to the law of sin. The difference
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
INWARD, MAN
INWARD, MAN<in’-werd>: A Pauline term, nearly identical with the “hidden man of the heart” (1 Pet 3:4). The Greek original, 5 [ὁ ἔσω, ho eso] (also [ἔσωθεν, esothen]) [ἄνθρωπος, anthropos] (Rom 7:22) is lexigraphically defined “the internal man,” i.e. “soul,” “conscience.” It is the
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Inner Man, Inward Man
INNER MAN, INWARD MAN Component of human personality responsive to the requirements of the law. According to Paul’s understanding (Rom. 7:22–23), human personality has three components: (1) the inmost self where the law dwells; Paul equated this with reason (nous, vs. 23); the inmost self approximates
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Inner Being
inner being. This phrase is used by the NIV and other translations to render Greek esō anthrōpos, (lit., “man inside,” Rom. 7:22 [KJV, “inward man”; NRSV, “inmost self”]; Eph. 3:16). The concept of an inner being is reflected elsewhere in the Bible. It refers to the true ego, whereas the outer person
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Inward, Man
INWARD, inʹwẽrd, MAN: A Pauline term, nearly identical with the “hidden man of the heart” (1 Pet 3:4). The Gr original, ὁ ἔσω (also ἔσωθεν) ἄνθρωπος, ho ésō (ésōthen) ánthrōpos (Rom 7:22) is lexigraphically defined “the internal man,” i.e. “soul,” “conscience.” It is the immaterial part of
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
INNER PERSON
INNER PERSON, INNER BEING [ὁ ἔσω ἄνθρωπος ho esō anthrōpos]. The Greco-Roman world commonly understood the person to consist of two elements, body and soul. This anthropological dualism forms the background for Paul’s meditation on the “treasure in clay jars” (2 Cor 4:7–18). Reflecting upon the
Key passages
Ro 7:22

For I joyfully agree with the law of God in my inner person,