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Ink
Occupational Objects
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Writing and Writing Materials
WRITING AND WRITING MATERIALS. The Bible consists of a corpus of literature which was set down in writing during a period from the end of the 2d millennium b.c. until the beginning of the Common Era. As such, it has an important place in the history of writing and, more precisely, in the history of the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ink
Ink[Heb de, from a root meaning “slowly flowing” (see BDB, p. 188); Gk. mélan—‘black’]. Any fluid substance used with pen or brush to form written characters. In this sense ink is mentioned once in the OT (Jer. 36:18) and three times in the NT (2 Cor. 3:3; 2 Jn. 12; 3 Jn. 13), and it is implied
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ink
ink, in antiquity a liquid material made from soot, gum arabic, and water, used for writing on papyrus. Since this kind of ink does not stick well to leather or parchment, scribes also employed ink made with tannic acid derived from nut galls (oak galls). These were pulverized and then mixed with sulfate
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ink
Ancient writing equipment from Egypt. At one end of the pen case was an inkwell. BMINK. Ink was used in Egypt as early as 2500 b.c. One OT reference says that Baruch wrote Jeremiah’s prophecies “with ink” (Jer 36:18). The word ink occurs in the NT in 2 Cor 3:3; 2 Jn 12; 3 Jn 13 as the translation
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ink
InkA liquid like water or oil made of the soot of burnt resin, pitch, or wood and mixed with gum for use in writing. Black was the most common color of ink in the biblical world, though other known colors were red (made with red ochre or iron oxide), yellow (most likely from iron or yellow ochre), purple
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ink
Ink (Heb. de; Gk. mélan).† In antiquity, black ink was produced by mixing the soot of burned resin, pitch, fir wood, or oil (lampblack) with gum and water, oil, or other liquids. Generally the ink was dried into solid cakes which had to be moistened with liquid before using Red ink, in which
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Writing Materials
WRITING MATERIALS The beginning of writing marks the transition from the prehistoric and protohistoric periods to historical times. The early symbols used for expressing thoughts in writing were very complicated and only a skilled elite was capable of mastering them. Even when the number of symbols had
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ink
INK Ancient forms of ink were made from wood, ivory, or other materials burned to create carbon that was then suspended in a gum or glue solution. Ink is mentioned specifically only in Jer 36:18; 2 Cor 3:3; 2 John 12; and 3 John 13.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Ink
INK (Heb. dyô, Jer. 36:18; Gk. melan, “black,” 2 Cor. 3:3; 2 John 12; 3 John 13). The ink of the ancients was composed of powdered charcoal, lampblack, or soot mixed with gum and water. It was intensely black and would retain its color for a long time but was easily erased from the parchments with sponge
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Ink
Inkink, in antiquity a liquid material used for writing on papyrus, made from soot, gum arabic, and water. Since this kind of ink does not stick well to leather or parchment, scribes also employed ink made with tannic acid derived from nut galls (oak galls). These were pulverized and then mixed with
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Ink
INK — fluid made from powdered charcoal, lampblack, or soot mixed with water and sometimes tree resin (Jer. 36:18). In this form it could be erased with water. Iron or other metal oxides were added to make the ink more permanent and to change the color. Most ancient ink was black. Actual specimens of
Writing Materials
WRITING MATERIALS — ancient surfaces, such as animal skins and stone, on which information was recorded in Bible times. The earliest writing materials were clay tablets or stone (Ex. 32:16; Job 19:23–24). An engraving tool or a chisel was used to write on stone, bricks, and tablets (Is. 8:1). A reed
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
INK
INK<ink> ([דְּיוֹ‎, deyo], from root meaning “slowly flowing,” BDB, 188; [μέλαν, melan], “black”): Any fluid substance used with pen or brush to form written characters. In this sense ink is mentioned once in the Hebrew Bible (Jer 36:2) and 3 times in the Greek New Testament (2 Cor 3:3; 2 Jn