Loading…
Inhabitants of Damascus
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
According to 1 Chr 18:5, 2 Chr 28:5, and Isa 7:8, Damascus was the chief city of Syria. In addition to the biblical record, references to Damascus are found in the annals of Thutmose III (15th century bc), the Amarna letters (14th century bc), and a letter addressed to Zalia, a king of Damascus, found in Lebanon that also dates to the 14th century bc (Pitard, Ancient Damascus, 1). There is little consensus on the linguistic origin or meaning of the word “Damascus” (Pitard, Ancient Damascus, 7).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Damascus
Damascus (דַּמֶּשֶׁק‎, dammesheq; Δαμασκός, Damaskos). According to 1 Chr 18:5, 2 Chr 28:5, and Isa 7:8, Damascus was the chief city of Syria. In addition to the biblical record, references to Damascus are found in the annals of Thutmose III (15th century bc), the Amarna letters (14th century bc), and
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Damascus (Place)
DAMASCUS (PLACE) [Heb dammeśeq (דַּמֶּשֶׂק‎), dûmmeśeq (דּוּמֶּשֶׂק‎), darmeśeq (דַּרְמֶשֶׂק)]. DAMASCENE. A city of S Syria, which is not only the capital of modern Syria, but was the capital of the nation of Aram during the 10th through 8th centuries b.c.e. Aram was a constant rival to, and sometimes
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Damascus, Damascenes
Damascus, Damascenes. Syrian oasis city protected on three sides by mountains, and situated on trade routes about 160 miles northeast of Jerusalem. The name Damascus can also refer to the surrounding area and to the southern Syrian state. Though close to the desert, the district is rich in almonds, apricots,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Damascus
Damascus də-masʹkəs [Heb. dammeśeq; Aram darmeśeq (1 Ch. 18:5; 2 Ch. 28:5); Gk. Damaskos; Akk. Dimiŝqi, Dimas/šqi; Am. Tab. Dimašqa, Dumašqa; Egyp. Timašgi; Arab Dimashq (ash-Sham)]. A city of Syria (Aram). The capital of modern Syria, Damascus has survived continuously from at least 2000 b.c.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Damascus
DAMASCUS Syrian oasis city protected on three sides by mountains and situated on trade routes about 160 miles (257 kilometers) northeast of Jerusalem. The name Damascus can also refer to the surrounding area and to the southern Syrian state. Though close to the desert, the district is rich in almonds,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Damascus
Damascus (duh-mas´kuhs), an ancient (and modern) city in Syria, located about sixty miles east of the Mediterranean coast, east of Sidon. On a plateau about 2,300 feet above sea level, the city had the waters of the oasis Ghuta, which was nourished by the twin rivers draining eastward from the Anti-Lebanon
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Damascus
Damascus. HFVDAMASCUS. Damascus (Gr. damaskos, Heb. dammaśeq, Aram darmeśeq, (1 Chr 18:5; 2 Chr 28:5), the chief city of ancient Aram (Isa 7:8), has had a long history reaching back to prehistoric times. The ˒Ăram Darmeseq of (1 Chr 18:6) corresponds to modern Damascus. The city was known to the
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Damascus
Damascus (Heb. dammekeq; Gk. Damaskós)A city in southern Syria that played an important role in the political history of Israel during the 1st millennium b.c.e. Damascus also appears in the NT in connection with the conversion of Saul of Tarsus to Christianity.The city is located in a well-watered
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Damascus
Damascus [də măsˊkəs] (Heb. dammeśeq; Aram. darmeśeq; Gk. Damaskos). † A city in Syria and one of the oldest continuously occupied cities in the world.
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Damascus
DAMASCUS City at the foot of the Anti-Lebanon, within an oasis richly supplied with water (2 Kgs. 5:12). It is situated at the crossroads of the two main international highways of the ancient Near East, the Via Maris, connecting Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean and Egypt, and the King’s Highway, connecting
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Damascus
DAMASCUS One of the chief cities of Syria, located on a fertile plain fed by the Abana (modern Barada) and Pharpar rivers (2 Kgs 5:12) on the frontiers of the Syrian desert. The city is an ancient one whose origins are obscure; its location on the major trade routes made it one of the region’s most thriving
See also
Related