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Individualism
Individual
Dictionaries
Pocket Dictionary of Ethics
Individualism
individualism. An approach to social and ethical theory that suggests that the locus of decision and action lies in the individual human person and that people derive their personal identities from the choices that they make as individuals, more than from the groups or communities in which they participate
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Individualism
INDIVIDUALISM.—The word individualism is used in two senses, and the difference of meaning is constantly employed in order to discredit one set of ideas by arguing against the other. In a general way the uses may be distinguished by calling the one philosophical and the other political. Individualism,
Individual
INDIVIDUAL.—It has almost become a commonplace of Apologetics that the significance of the individual is first recognized in Christianity. In Antiquity the idea that the individual might stand over against the State, either through the sense of duty or the sense of truth, was not entertained. Most ancient
Individuality
INDIVIDUALITY.—The word ‘individuality’ may be used merely for the quality of being an individual, but its common use is to indicate the special characteristics which distinguish one individual from another, that which, as it has been expressed, marks each one as a particular thought of God. Only in
Individuality
INDIVIDUALITY (of Christ).—Regarded simply as a historical character, or as a subject of a visible career among men, Christ undoubtedly presents as distinct an aspect of individuality, or concrete reality, as can be affirmed of any historical personage. On the other hand, when we pass from the historical
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
INDIVIDUAL
INDIVIDUAL, INDIVIDUALISM. The philosophy of individualism, which emerged in the 18th cent., proposes that the individual human comprises the basic unit of meaning for humankind. This may be contrasted with a view that one of any number of collectives (family, church, society) constitutes that basic