Loading…
Imputation
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The act of reckoning a legal debit or credit to an account. The term was used in Graeco-Roman legal language and was understood in secular commerce as “enter into the books” (Balz and Schneider, 355). The concept is also used in a religious sense in the Old and New Testament. Protestant Christians recognize imputation in three doctrinal areas: original sin, atonement, and justification.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Imputation
Imputation The act of reckoning a legal debit or credit to an account. The term was used in Graeco-Roman legal language and was understood in secular commerce as “enter into the books” (Balz and Schneider, 355). The concept is also used in a religious sense in the Old and New Testament. Protestant Christians
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Imputation
Imputation. Charging to an account, used in the Bible with legal reference to sin and salvation being recorded by God. The biblical teaching on imputation represents one of the principal doctrines of the Christian faith. Although the noun form is not found in Scripture, the verb “to impute” occurs frequently
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Imputation
IMPUTATION* Charging to an account, used in the Bible with legal reference to sin and salvation being recorded by God. The biblical teaching on imputation represents one of the principal doctrines of the Christian faith. Although the noun form is not found in Scripture, the verb “to impute” occurs frequently
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Imputation, Impute
IMPUTATION, IMPUTE. In the OT this concept is found in the common Heb. verb ḥāshab, “to think, count, be accounted” (KJV “impute,” (Lev 7:18; 17:4; 2 Sam 19:19; Ps 32:2). In the NT it is represented by the Gr. ellogeō, “to impute, lay to one’s charge” (used only twice, in Rom 5:13 and Phm 19), and
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
imputation
imputation (from Lat. imputare, Gk. λογίζεσθαι). A central aspect of classical *Protestant theologies of *justification, according to which the righteousness of Christ is imputed or reckoned to the believer, despite being extrinsic to his person, in order that he may be justified on its basis. This
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Imputation
IMPUTATION. One of the major doctrines of Christianity. It has produced a great deal of theological controversy (see Hagenbach and Shedd, History of Doctrine). The actual word impute means to “reckon over unto one’s account.” The case of the apostle’s writing to Philemon concerning whatever his runaway
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Imputation
Imputationis used to designate any action or word or thing as reckoned to a person. Thus in doctrinal language (1) the sin of Adam is imputed to all his descendants, i.e., it is reckoned as theirs, and they are dealt with therefore as guilty; (2) the righteousness of Christ is imputed to them that believe
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Imputation
IMPUTATION — charging or reckoning something to a person’s account. A good example of the idea of imputation occurs in Philemon 18, where Paul says that any wrong or debt caused by the runaway slave, Onesimus, should be “put on my account.” Three distinct theological truths in the Bible are directly
The Lutheran Cyclopedia
Imputation
Imputation, a term used to denote theories explanatory of the principle on which both sin and righteousness are accounted to men. It is applied in two distinct relations: (1) With respect to the way in which the punitive consequences of Adam’s sin are inherited by all mankind. In the Early Church no
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Imputation
Imputation is one of the most common technical expressions in Christian theology. It is meant to denote the transference of guilt or of merit, of punishment or reward. The doctrine of the imputation of sin, for example, is the doctrine which inculcates that all mankind are sharers in the fact and consequences
Key passages
Ps 32:1–3

Happy is he whose transgression is taken away, whose sin is covered. Happy is a person to whom Yahweh does not impute iniquity and in whose spirit there is not deceit. When I kept silent, my bones were worn out due to my groaning all the day.

2 Co 5:21

He made the one who did not know sin to be sin on our behalf, in order that we could become the righteousness of God in him.