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Image in Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Second king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, who reigned for 43 years (605–562 bc). He succeeded his father, Nabopolassar, and was followed by his son, Evil-Merodach. He is sometimes referred to as “Nebuchadnezzar II” to distinguish him from a 12th-century bc Babylonian king of the same name.In the Old Testament, Nebuchadnezzar is best known for conquering Jerusalem and initiating the Babylonian exile, and as the Babylonian king in the book of Daniel. In addition to the biblical writings, an important contemporary source for Nebuchadnezzar is the Babylonian Chronicle, which narrates the first 11 years of his reign (Glassner, Mesopotamian Chronicles, 228–31).Nebuchadnezzar was the son of Nabopolassar, the founder of what later came to be called the Chaldean or Neo-Babylonian dynasty. While he was still crown prince, Nebuchadnezzar gained prestige as a military commander by defeating the Egyptians under Pharaoh Neco at the Battle of Carchemish (2 Kgs 24:7; 2 Chr 35:20; Jer 46:2). This battle, which occurred in the spring of 605 bc, brought Syria and Phoenicia under Babylonian control. After his father’s death in August of that year, Nebuchadnezzar returned to Babylon to become king.Nebuchadnezzar spent the next several years campaigning in the west, and he subjugated Judah and its king, Jehoiakim, during this time (2 Kgs 24:1). In 601 bc, he fought Egypt again but suffered setbacks, being forced to return to Babylon and spend a year strengthening his army. This led to uprisings in Babylon’s conquered territories, including Judah (2 Kgs 24:1–2). In 598–597 bc, Nebuchadnezzar fought against Jerusalem, at which time Jehoiakim either died or was taken by Nebuchadnezzar to Babylon (2 Kgs 24:6; 2 Chr 36:6–7; for more details see the article Jehoiakim, King of Judah). Three months later, Nebuchadnezzar deported Jehoiakim’s son Jehoiachin to Babylon, and left Jehoiachin’s uncle Zedekiah as a puppet ruler (2 Kgs 24:10–17; 2 Chr 36:9–10). Many prominent residents of Judah were deported at this time, including the prophet Ezekiel (2 Kgs 24:14–16; Ezek 1:1–3). It is possible that Daniel and his companions were also brought to Babylon at this time, though some date this event to Nebuchadnezzar’s initial subjugation of Judah in 605 bc instead (Dan 1:1; cf. Jer 25:1). In 589, Zedekiah rebelled. Nebuchadnezzar laid siege to Jerusalem for a final time, conquering it, destroying the temple, and carrying the people into exile in 586 bc.In Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar gained a reputation as a great builder. He is credited by the Babylonian priest Berossus (ca. 290 bc) with creating the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world (cited in Josephus, Against Apion 1.134–41). One example of his building projects is the Ishtar Gate, which was excavated in the early 20th century and reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. Nebuchadnezzar died in 562 bc and was succeeded by his son, Evil-Merodach.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar (נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּר‎, nevukhadnetstsar; נְבוּכַדְרֶאצַּר‎, nevukhadretstsar; in Jeremiah and Ezekiel). Second king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, who reigned for 43 years (605–562 bc). He succeeded his father, Nabopolassar, and was followed by his son, Evil-Merodach. He is sometimes referred
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Nebuchadnezzar (Person)
NEBUCHADNEZZAR (PERSON) [Heb nĕbûkadne (ʾ)ṣṣar (נְבוּכַדְנֶאצַּר)]. Var. NEBUCHADREZZAR. The second king of the Chaldean dynasty of Babylonia, successor to his father Nabopolassar. Nebuchadnezzar (Akk Nabu-kudurri-uṣur) ruled for 43 years (605–562 b.c.). Before his reign began, he developed a considerable
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuchadrezzar
Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuchadrezzar. Babylonian king (605–562 bc) who captured and destroyed Jerusalem in 586 bc. He was the son of Nabopolassar and the foremost ruler of the Neo-Babylonian Empire (612–539 bc); his name is alternately spelled Nebuchadrezzar in Jeremiah and Ezekiel.Nebuchadnezzar states that
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Nabuchodonosor
Nabuchodonosor nab-ə-kə-donʹə-soɾr. The AV Apoc. form of Nebuchadrezzar, rendering LXX Nabouchodonosor (e.g., 1 Esd. 1:40f, 45, 48; Ad. Est. 11:4; Bar. 1:9, 11f.).
Nebuchadrezzar
Nebuchadrezzar neb-ə-kə-drezʹər, neb-yoo̅-kə-drezʹ-ər; NEBUCHADNEZZAR neb-ə-kəd-nezʹər, neb-yoo̅-kəd-nezʹər [Heb neḇûḵaḏreʾṣṣar, neḇûḵaḏneʾṣṣar < Akk. nabû-kudurri-uṣur—‘Nabu has guarded my boundary-stone’ or ‘May Nabu protect …’ or ‘… the accession-rights’; Gk Nabouchodonosor]. King
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuchadrezzar
NEBUCHADNEZZAR, NEBUCHADREZZAR* Babylonian king (605–562 bc) who captured and destroyed Jerusalem in 586 bc. He was the son of Nabopolassar and the foremost ruler of the Neo-Babylonian Empire (612–539 bc); his name is alternately spelled Nebuchadrezzar in Jeremiah and Ezekiel (see nlt mg).Nebuchadnezzar
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar (neb´uh-kuhd-nez´uhr; Babylonian, “O Nabu, preserve the offspring [lit., ‘boundary stone’]”), the name of four kings now known to us from ancient Mesopotamia. The first was the king of the Second Dynasty of Isin (southern Mesopotamia), who ruled 1124–1103 bce. He is known as Nebuchadnezzar
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Nebuchadnezzar
NEBUCHADNEZZAR, NEBUCHADREZZARThe name. The throne-name Nabûkudurrī-uṣur (“Nebo, Protect My Frontier!”) was adopted by four Babylonian monarchs, only one of whom (Nebuchadnezzar II) is mentioned in the Bible, though with a frequency and emphasis that witness to his important role is redemptive history.
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Nebuchadrezzar, Nebuchadnezzar
NEBUCHADREZZAR, NEBUCHADNEZZAR. The king of Babylon (605–562 bc) frequently named by the prophets Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, and in the history of the last days of Judah. His name in Heb. (neḇūḵaḏre’ṣṣar) transliterates the Bab. Nabū-kudurri-uṣur, meaning perhaps ‘Nabû has protected the succession-rights’.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar (Heb. nĕḇûḵaḏneʾṣṣar), NEBUCHADREZZAR (nĕḇûḵaḏreʾṣṣar)King of Babylon for 43 years (605–562 b.c.e.), more than any other monarch of the Chaldean dynasty. He succeeded his father Nabopolassar (Akk. Nabû-apla-uṣur), who founded the dynasty. Nebuchadnezzar II (Akk. Nabû-
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuchadrezzar
NEBUCHADNEZZAR [nĕbˊə kəd nĕzˊər, nĕbˊōō kəd nĕzˊər] (Heb. neḇûḵaḏne˒ ṣṣar), NEBUCHADREZZAR [nĕbˊə kəd rĕzˊər, nĕbˊōō kəd rĕzˊər] (neḇûḵaḏ-re˒ṣṣar; Akk. Nabûkudurri-uṣur “may Naû protect the boundary” or “succession”). †
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Nebuchadnezzar
NEBUCHADNEZZAR (Akkadian, “Nabu has protected the country”; see Nebo) Also spelled Nebuchadrezzar. The king of Babylon from 605 to 562 b.c., and the son and successor to Nabopolassar. He is best known in Scripture for his conquest of Judah and Jerusalem in 586 b.c. The heir to the founder of the Chaldean
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnez´zar, or Nebuchadrez´zar (may Nebo protect the crown), was the greatest and most powerful of the Babylonian kings. His name is explained to mean “Nebo is the protector against misfortune.” He was the son and successor of Nabopolassar, the founder of the Babylonian empire. In the lifetime of
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