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Ignorance
Ignorance of God • Ignorant • Naive • Unaware
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ignorance
Ignorance[Heb peṯî (Ezk. 45:20); Gk. ágnoia (Acts 3:17; 17:30; Eph. 4:18; 1 Pet. 1:14), agnōsía (1 Pet. 2:15)]; AV also SIMPLE; NEB also FOOLISH (Ezk. 45:20); IGNORANT [Heb. lōʾ yāḏaʿ (Ps. 73:22); Gk. agnoéō (Rom. 10:3; 2 Cor. 1:8; 2:11; 1 Thess. 4:13; 1 Tim. 1:13; He. 5:2; 2 Pet. 2:12),
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ignorance
IGNORANCE. In the OT God made provision for sins committed in “ignorance” (Heb. sh-gāgâ, “error,” “wandering astray”) as seen in Lev 4; 5; Num 15:22–29, in distinction to sins of presumption. Such sins produced guilt. They were not necessarily done unconsciously but unintentionally, but of weakness
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ignorance
IGNORANCE. As is the case with *knowledge, ignorance has in Scripture a moral rather than a purely intellectual connotation, except in such casual uses as the Pauline ‘I would not have you ignorant, brethren …’ (Rom. 1:13, av), which simply means ‘I want you to know …’ (rsv).In the books of the Law
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Ignorance
IGNORANCE. The term implies “error, going astray” (cf. Lev. 4:2, “If a person sins unintentionally”). In the NT the Greek means “want of knowledge”; sometimes simple, excusable want of information (Acts 17:30); sometimes inexcusable (Eph. 4:18); sometimes moral blindness or sinful ignorance (Acts 3:17).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
IGNORANCE
IGNORANCE<ig’-no-rans> ([שְׁגָגָה‎, sheghaghah]; [ἄγνοια, agnoia]): “Ignorance” is the translation of sheghaghah, “wandering,” “going astray” (Lev 4:2, etc., “if a soul sin through ignorance,” the Revised Version (British and American) “unwittingly,” margin “through error”; Lev 5:15;
A Catholic Dictionary
Ignorance
ignorance. St. Thomas (I 2ndæ, lxxvi. 2) distinguishes ignorance from mere nescience. The latter he explains to mean the simple absence of knowledge; the former implies absence of knowledge in one who is capable of acquiring it. He proceeds to show that ignorance may easily involve sin, since a person
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Ignorance
IGNORANCE Old Testament law distinguished between sins of ignorance, or sin unintentionally (Lev. 4:2, 13–14; Num. 15:24–29), and premeditated sins (“sin presumptuously” or with a high hand, Num. 15:30–31). Sins committed in ignorance incur guilt (Lev. 4:13, 22, 27); however, the sacrificial system provided
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Ignorance
ignorance. In some instances, ignorance in biblical usage denotes merely an innocent lack of information (Acts 23:5; 2 Cor. 1:8). In its distinctively biblical meaning, it is a specifically religious rather than an intellectual concept. Ignorance is a quality, not of the academically unschooled, but
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Ignorance
IGNORANCE, igʹnō̇-rans (שְׁגָגָה‎, sheghāghāh; ἄγνοια, ágnoia): “Ignorance” is the tr of sheghāghāh, “wandering,” “going astray” (Lev 4:2, etc, “if a soul sin through ignorance,” RV “unwittingly,” m “through error”; 5:15; Nu 15:24 ff; cf 35:11; Josh 20:3 ff; Eccl 5:6; 10:5, “an error”). In the
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
IGNORANCE
IGNORANCE [פֶּתִיpethi, פְּתַיּוּתpethayyuth; ἀγνοέω agnoeō, ἄγνοια agnoia, ἀγνωσία agnōsia]. Several Hebrew and Greek terms are translated in the NRSV as “ignorance,” “ignorant,” and “ignorantly.” Whatever the term utilized, the basic sense is that of not knowing, whether innocently or culpably.