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Idumeans
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Also known as Idumaea. The Greek name for a territory located south of Judaea during the Second Temple period, in the same general area as the ancient land of Edom. Homeland of Herod the Great. Referenced once in the New Testament (Mark 3:8). Played an important role in the military conflicts of the Second Temple period.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Idumea
Idumea (Ἰδουμαια, Idoumaia). Also known as Idumaea. The Greek name for a territory located south of Judaea during the Second Temple period, in the same general area as the ancient land of Edom. Homeland of Herod the Great. Referenced once in the New Testament (Mark 3:8). Played an important role in the
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Idumea (Place)
IDUMEA (PLACE) [Gk Idoumaia (Ἰδουμαια)]. IDUMEANS. A territory that during the Second Temple period stretched approximately from the S portion of the Judean hill country to the N part of the Negeb. To the N, the borders ran between Beth-Zur and Alouros (Ḥalḥūl), while the S border reached the height
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Idumaea, Idumeans
Idumaea, Idumeans. Term derived from the Greek form of Edom (“red”). The change from Edomite to Idumean resulted from the conquests of Alexander the Great, which made Greek the common language of the area. The name was applied to the former country of the Edomites and to the portion of south Judah occupied
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Idumea
Idumea id-ū-mēʹə [Gk. Idoumaia, Idoumea—‘(land) of the Edomites’]. The Greek name for Edom as found in the LXX and sometimes used interchangeably with Edom in the AV. The name was eventually attached to the region S of Judea occupied by Edomites (Idumeans) who moved there after the fall of Jerusalem
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Idumaea, Idumea, Idumeans
IDUMAEA*, IDUMEA, IDUMEANS Term derived from the Greek form of Edom (“red”). The change from Edomite to Idumean resulted from the conquests of Alexander the Great, which made Greek the common language of the area. The name was applied to the former country of the Edomites and to the portion of south
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Idumea
Idumea (id´yoo-mee´uh), the Greek name for Edom as found in the lxx. After the exile (587/6 bce) the name designated the region in Judea from Beth-zur to south of Beer-sheba, an area occupied in part by Edomites (Idumeans, Ezek. 36:5). Throughout the Seleucid, Hasmonean, and Herodian periods (ca. 198
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Idumaea
IDUMAEA. This term was used by the Greeks and Romans (with slightly different spellings) to refer to the region inhabited by the descendants of Esau—the Edomites of the OT. See Esau. The word appears once in the Bible, Mk 3:8 (the KJV uses it in Isa 34:5–6; Ezk 35:15; 36:5), but Edom is given by other
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Idumaea
IDUMAEA. The Gk. form (idoumaia) of the Heb. ’eḏôm refers to an area in W Palestine, rather than to Edom proper. At the time of the Exodus, Edom extended to both sides of the Arabah, and the W portion reached close to Kadesh (Nu. 20:16). David subdued Edom, but there was continual conflict between
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Idumea
Idumea (Gk. Idoumaɩ́a, Idouméa)Designation used in the Hellenistic age for the territory stretching north to south from the southern portion of the Judean hill country to the northern part of the Negeb, and east to west from the Judean desert to the Philistine cities of Gaza and Ashdod. Its major cities
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Idumea
Idumea [ĭdˊŏo mēˊyə] (Gk. Idoumaia, Idoumea “[land] of the Edomites”).† The Hellenistic Greek name for the territory south of Judea then inhabited by the Edomites, who had been displaced from their territory by the Nabateans; in the LXX and Josephus the term designates Edom proper. Located west
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Idumea
IDUMEA The region south of Judea, which in the Persian period was settled by Edomites. It included the southern hills of Judah, its southern border being north of Beer-Sheba. In the early Hellenistic period Marissa (Mareshah) became its capital. During the reign of the Seleucids Idumea was enlarged to
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Idumea
IDUME´A (id-u-mēʹa; Gk. “pertaining to Edom”). This is a term employed by Greeks and Romans for the country of Edom (Mark 3:8 and in KJV only, Isa. 34:5–6; Ezek. 35:15; 36:5). After the fall of Jerusalem (587 b.c.) the Edomites began to advance northward (36:5). By 312 b.c. the Nabataeans, who established
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