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Hymn
Hymnody • Lyric • Lyrics
Dictionaries
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Hymn
hymn, broadly speaking, any poetical composition in honor of God or suitable for use in a liturgical setting, i.e., in worship. Such poetic pieces could be sung or chanted or recited antiphonally (i.e., in a responsive reading). With this understanding, many of the Psalms in the Bible would fall into
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Hymn
HYMN. The Gk. hymnos was used by the classical writers to signify any ode or song written in praise of gods or heroes, and occasionally by lxx translators of praise to God, e.g. Pss. 40:3; 65:1; Is. 42:10. In the NT the word occurs only in Eph. 5:19 and Col. 3:16, with the verbal form (hymneō) in Mt.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hymn
Hymn. A sacred song; a song of praise or thanksgiving to God. The oldest collection of such songs in the Bible is the book of Psalms, but other religious songs are included as well: The Song of the Sea (Exod. 15:1–18), the Song of Moses (Deut. 32:1–43), The Song of Deborah (Judg. 5), the Song of Hannah
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Hymn
HYMN A song of praise to God. The Psalms were the chief source of hymns in the Old Testament (e.g., Ps 8, 19, 29, 33, 65, 100, 103–105, 135–136, 145–150), although they are found in many other places (Exod 15:1–18; Judg 5:9–16, 13:13–25; 1 Sam 2:1–10; Isa 42:10–12, 44:23, 52:9–10; Sir 39:14–35, 42:15–43:33).
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Hymns, Songs
Hymns, SongsSinging hymns as spontaneous praise to deities in public assembly, with or without musical instruments, had been a common practice in Jewish and the pagan communities long before the NT era (Norden). When Christianity, with its Jewish and pagan converts and the presence of the Holy Spirit,
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
hymns
hymns (Gk. ὕμνος, ‘song in praise of gods or heroes’). Sacred poetry set to music and sung in the course of the services of the Church has always formed part of Christian worship, whether to express doctrine or the devotion of individuals. At first the hymns of the Jewish Church, esp. the Psalms, were
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Hymn
Hymn, a religious song or psalm. Eph. 5:19; Col. 3:16. Our Lord and his apostles sung a hymn after the last supper. In the jail at Philippi, Paul and Silas “sang hymns” (Authorized Version “praises”) unto God, and so loud was their song that their fellow prisoners heard them.
Encyclopedia of the Reformed Faith
Hymnody
HymnodyFor two centuries after the Reformation, followers of John Calvin sang only scriptural songs, mostly metrical versions of the psalms. Psalters began to be published in Geneva, at first incomplete (1542), with periodic updates, until a completed volume of 150 psalms and 125 tunes was published
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Hymn
Hymnoccurs only Eph. 5:19 and Col. 3:16. The verb to “sing an hymn” occurs Matt. 26:30 and Mark 14:26. The same Greek word is rendered to “sing praises” Acts 16:25 (R.V., “sing hymns”) and Heb. 2:12. The “hymn” which our Lord sang with his disciples at the last Supper is generally supposed to have been
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Hymn
Hymnhymn, broadly speaking, any poetical composition in honor of God or suitable for use in a liturgical setting, i.e., in worship. Such poetical pieces could be sung or chanted or recited antiphonally as in a responsive reading. With this understanding, many of the Psalms in the ot fall into the category
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Lyric
LyricThe term poem is almost synonymous with lyric. A lyric is a short poem, sometimes sung or accompanied by music, expressing the thoughts or feelings of a speaker who speaks in the first person (“I” or “we”). The subjective or personal element is especially regarded as the authentic note of lyric.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HYMN
HYMN<him> ([ὕμνος, humnos]): In Col 3:16; Eph 5:19 Paul bids his readers sing “psalms and hymns and spiritual songs.” Gregory of Nyssa (4th century) distinguishes these as follows: the Psalms were accompanied by instruments, the hymns were mainly vocal, and the song, ode, was a general term