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House of the Archives
Archives • House of the Rolls • King’s Treasure House • Treasure houses
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Archives, House of the
Archives, House of the. Building used for storage of records, annals, and decrees; a common structure in Near Eastern nations in the second millennium bc (Ezr 5:17–6:1). In the archives at Ecbatana, a summer resort for Persian kings, King Darius (521–486 bc) found an edict of Cyrus (559–530 bc) that
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Archives, Royal
Archives, Royal [Aram bêṯ ginzayyā’ dî-malkā’] (Ezr. 5:17); AV “king’s treasure house”; HOUSE OF THE ARCHIVES [Aram bêṯ sip̱rayyā’] (6:1); AV “house of the rolls.” A section of the royal treasury in which official memoranda, public records, and historical documents were housed. Subsequently
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
House of the Archives
HOUSE OF THE ARCHIVES* Building used for storage of records, annals, and decrees; a common structure in Near Eastern nations in the second millennium bc (Ezr 5:17–6:1). In the archives at Ecbatana, a summer resort for Persian kings, King Darius (521–486 bc) found an edict of Cyrus (559–530 bc) that entitled
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Archives
Archives. A section of the royal treasury in which official documents were stored. Provincial officials requested that the Persian king Darius search the royal archives (Ezra 5:17; Aram. bêṯ ginzayyā˒ dî-malkā˒; KJV “king’s treasure house”; JB “muniment room”; cf. 7:20 “king’s treasury”)
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Treasure houses
Treasure housesthe houses or magazines built for the safe keeping of treasure and valuable articles of any kind (Ezra 5:17; 7:20; Neh. 10:38; Dan. 1:2).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ARCHIVES
ARCHIVES<ar’-kivs> (the more correct the Revised Version (British and American) rendition of בֵּית סִפְרַיָּא‎ [beth ciphrayya’], in Ezra 6:1, “house of the archives” instead of “house of rolls” as in the King James Version): A part of the royal treasure-house (5:17), in which important state
The Lutheran Cyclopedia
Archives
Archives. Unless some permanent place be provided where official church records can be cared for under efficient supervision, the danger of their destruction, as time advances is very great. Besides, their value is increased as they can be conveniently compared in the search for data. Much gratitude
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Archives
Archives.—Rooms to keep for safety and examination public records and historical documents. The principal archives of the Church, from apostolic times to the present day, are those contained in the Vatican at Rome. Pope Leo XIII. has graciously opened the Vatican Archives to public examination. They
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
House of the Rolls
HOUSE OF THE ROLLS Place mentioned in Ezra 6:1 where records of the king’s decrees and actions were kept. The archives were kept sometimes in the royal treasury (Ezra 5:17) or perhaps in the temple. Jeremiah’s scroll (Jer. 36:20–26) and the scroll of the law (2 Kings 22:8–9) were probably kept in such
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Archives
archives. Archives were common among the nations of the ANE from the 2nd millennium b.c. onward. The Babylonian and Assyrian kingdoms kept chronicles of their royal deeds as did the Persians (Esth. 2:23; 6:1). Temples and palaces had rooms for storage of such records. The location of Persian archives
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Archives
ARCHIVES, ärʹkīvs (the more correct RV rendition of בֵּית סִפְרַיָּא‎, bēth ṣiphrayyā’, in Ezr 6:1, “house of the archives” instead of “house of rolls” as in the AV): A part of the royal treasure-house (5:17), in which important state documents were kept.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ARCHIVES, HOUSE OF THE
ARCHIVES, HOUSE OF THE [בֵּית סִפְרַיָּאbeth sifrayyaʾ]. A section of the royal treasury (Ezra 5:17) where official documents were stored, perhaps as early as the Late Uruk period (late 4th millennium bce), although EBLA TEXTS provide the earliest archives found in situ (Early Bronze Age III, ca. 2400–2300