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Hosts
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hosts
Hosts (צָבָא‎, tsava'; στρατιά, stratia; Σαβαώθ, Sabaōth). Refers to both human armies (particularly Israel) and angelic armies. At times also refers to the heavenly bodies. Came to be used in a technical sense in conjunction with the divine name.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hosts, Host of Heaven
HOSTS, HOST OF HEAVEN. The term ṣābāʾ, pl. ṣĕbāʾôt (masc. pl. 2x; Pss 103:21; 148:2 [Q]), commonly translated “host,” “hosts,” denotes primarily a military retinue or army, a meaning consistent with its common Semitic etymology (cf. Akk. ṣābu; Old South Arabic ḍbʾ; Eth. ḍabʾa/ṣabʾa; Ug. ṣbʾu).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Host, Host of Heaven
Host, Host of Heaven. Hebrew expressions found frequently in the OT and literally meaning “army” and “army of the skies.” Host is basically a military term, occurring nearly 500 times in the OT, and can mean “army” (2 Kgs 18:17), “angels,” “heavenly bodies,” or “creation.”The phrase “host of heaven”
Sabaoth
Sabaoth. Hebrew word meaning “hosts” or “army,” as in the expression “Lord of hosts.”See God, Names of.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Host, Host of Heaven
HOST, HOST OF HEAVEN* Hebrew expressions found frequently in the OT and literally meaning “army” and “army of the skies.” “Host” is basically a military term, occurring nearly 500 times in the OT, and can mean “army” (2 Kgs 18:17), “angels,” “heavenly bodies,” or “creation.”The phrase “host of heaven”
Sabaoth
SABAOTH Hebrew word meaning “hosts” or “army,” as in the expression “Lord of hosts.” See God, Names of.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Sabaoth
SABAOTH. The transliteration of the plural form of the Heb. word meaning “army” or “host.” The connotation of organization as applied to creation, angels, heavenly bodies, or the migrating Israelites (Num 1:3 points to a leader or one of superior station. Accordingly the word gains prominence in the
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Host, Host of Heaven
HOST, HOST OF HEAVEN. In rsv, the word most commonly translated ‘host’ is ṣāḇā’, used nearly 400 times. ḥayil is also translated ‘host’ a number of times (but see *Army), while maḥaneh (‘host’ in av) is translated ‘camp’ or ‘encampment’. Each of these words, with due regard to its special emphasis,
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Host
Host (Lat. hostia). A sacrificial victim, and so the consecrated bread in the *Eucharist, regarded as the Sacrifice of the Body of Christ.
Sabaoth
Sabaoth (Heb. צְבָאוֹת; Gk. Σαβαώθ). This Hebrew word, which denotes ‘armies’ or ‘hosts’, is preserved untranslated in the phrase ‘Lord of Sabaoth’ in older translations of the NT (Rom. 9:29, Jas. 5:4) and in the traditional English version of the *Te Deum. See also lord of hosts.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Sabaoth
SAB´AOTH (Gk. sabaōth, for Heb. ṣbā˒ôt, “armies,” Rom. 9:29; James 5:4; “Almighty,” NIV). In the OT it frequently occurs in the epithet “Jehovah, God of hosts,” or simply “Jehovah of hosts.” This epithet “Jehovah, God of hosts” designates Him as the supreme head and commander of all the heavenly
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Sabaoth
Sabaoththe transliteration of the Hebrew word tsebhaʾoth, meaning “hosts,” “armies” (Rom. 9:29; James 5:4). In the LXX. the Hebrew word is rendered by “Almighty.” (See Rev. 4:8; comp. Isa. 6:3.) It may designate Jehovah as either (1) God of the armies of earth, or (2) God of the armies of the stars,
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Sabaoth
SABAOTH [SABB a ohth] — part of a name for God that means, literally, “hosts” (Rom. 9:29; James 5:4). This name refers specifically to God’s control over all creation.Also see God, Names of.
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Sabaoth
Sabaoth is one of those Hebrew words which were left untranslated in the earliest Latin version of the Holy Scriptures, called the Vetus Itala, and has been preserved in three places in the translation by St. Jerome. Sabaoth is plural and signifies armies. As the Roman Missal has always followed the
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Sabaoth
Sabʹa-oth [hosts]. In Rom. 9:29 and James 5:4 the Greek form of this Hebrew word is, in our Authorized Version, not translated, but transferred. It is a descriptive title of Jehovah “the Lord of hosts” (Isa. 6:3), and whether the word hosts refers to the angels or to the stars, or to both, it heightens