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Hope
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The confidence that, by integrating God’s redemptive acts in the past with trusting human responses in the present, the faithful will experience the fullness of God’s goodness both in the present and in the future.Biblical faith rests on the trustworthiness of God to keep His promises. The biblical view of hope is thus significantly different from that found in ancient Greek philosophy. The Greeks recognized that human beings expressed hope by nature; however, this kind of hope reflects both good and bad experiences. The future was thus a projection of one’s own subjective possibilities (Bultmann, “ἐλπίς, elpis,” 2.517). Biblical hope avoids this subjectivity by being founded on something that provides a sufficient basis for confidence in its fulfillment: God and His redemptive acts as they culminate in the birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hope
Hope The confidence that, by integrating God’s redemptive acts in the past with trusting human responses in the present, the faithful will experience the fullness of God’s goodness both in the present and in the future.Biblical faith rests on the trustworthiness of God to keep His promises. The biblical
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hope (NT)
HOPE (NT). Even if the noun “hope” (Gk elpı́s) is not found at all in the Gospels and the verb “to hope” (Gk elpı́zein) is found only five times in the Gospels—with the OT sense of “to trust” (Matt 12:21; John 5:45) or with a purely secular and nonreligious sense (Luke 6:34; 23:8; 24:21)—the idea of
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Hope
Hope. An expectation or belief in the fulfillment of something desired. Present hurts and uncertainty over what the future holds create the constant need for hope. Worldwide poverty, hunger, disease, and human potential to generate terror and destruction create a longing for something better. Historically
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hope
Hope[Heb bāṭaḥ—‘trust,’ yāḥal—‘wait for’, qāwâ—‘expect,’ tiqwâ—‘expectation’; Gk. elpízō, elpís, “hope”, also “expect” (2 Cor. 8:5)]. A concept involving trustful anticipation, particularly with reference to the fulfillment of the promises of God. I. General Considerations II. OT III.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Hope
HOPE An expectation or belief in the fulfillment of something desired. Present hurts and uncertainty over what the future holds create the constant need for hope. Worldwide poverty, hunger, disease, and human potential to generate terror and destruction create a longing for something better. Historically,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Hope
hope. In the Bible, hope is not normally expressed as desire (something good that one would like to have happen), but as expectation (something good that one knows is going to happen and, so, anticipates). In a religious sense, hope is the expectation of a favorable future under God’s direction.In the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Hope
HOPE. In the OT several Heb. words are translated “hope” which signify “trust,” “expectation,” or “prospect.” In both OT and NT the object of one’s hope varies according to human desires (Prov 13:12; e.g., gain, Acts 16:19; physical rescue, Acts 27:20; a husband, Ruth 1:12).The chief theological use
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Hope
HOPE. Hope, it would seem, is a psychological necessity, if man is to envisage the future at all. Even if there are no rational grounds for it, man still continues to hope. Very naturally such hope, even when it appears to be justified, is transient and illusory; and it is remarkable how often it is
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hope
HopeWhile modern connotations include shades of uncertainty associated with a desired outcome (akin to “wishful thinking”), the biblical understanding of hope is a much deeper concept that contributes significantly to the worldview of biblical faith. Included are an expectation of the future, trust
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hope
Hope. †Confident expectation, ranging in degree from an ordinary desire felt with eager anticipation to a defining characteristic of those who seek God and experience his grace. In the latter (theological) sense hope is a virtue constitutive of God’s people, both Israel in the Old Testament and the
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters
Hope
HopeHope is an essential characteristic of the Christian life and a central feature of Paul’s theology. Every statement Paul makes about Christian hope is also a statement about what God has given the believer in Christ. In his letters, especially the letter to the Romans, Paul explores the ground of
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Hope
HOPE The confident expectation of some desired good. Hope entails personal volition, and we must act to bring about what is desired; hope understands that what is desired will not necessarily be attained easily or readily. The opposite of hope is despair, a complete loss of confidence.In Scripture,
Key passages
Job 13:15

Look, though he kill me, I will hope in him; however, I will defend my ways before him.

Ps 33:17–22

The horse is a false hope for victory, nor can it save by the greatness of its power. Behold, the eye of Yahweh is on those who fear him, on those who hope for his loyal love to deliver their soul from death and to keep them alive in famine. Our soul waits for Yahweh; he is our help …

Pr 13:12

Hope that is deferred makes the heart sick, but a desire fulfilled is a tree of life.

Is 40:31

But those who wait for Yahweh shall renew their strength. They shall go up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not grow weary; they shall walk and not be faint.

Ro 15:13

Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

See also
Ezr 10:1–17; Job 11:1–20; Job 13:1–14:22; Job 17:1–16; Job 19:21–29; Job 27:1–23; Job 30:1–31; Ps 9:1–20; Ps 16:1–11; Ps 25:1–22; Ps 33:1–22; Ps 39:1–13; Ps 42:1–43:5; Ps 52:1–9; Ps 62:1–12; Ps 65:1–13; Ps 69:1–36; Ps 71:1–24; Ps 78:1–31; Ps 119:41–56; Ps 119:73–88; Ps 119:113–120; Ps 119:145–152; Ps 119:161–168; Ps 121:1–8; Ps 130:1–8; Ps 131:1–3; Ps 146:1–147:20; Pr 10:28; Pr 11:7; Pr 11:23; Pr 13:12; Pr 13:19; Pr 19:18; Pr 23:17–18; Pr 24:13–14; Pr 29:20; Ec 8:10–9:12; Is 8:11–22; Is 20:1–6; Is 38:1–22; Is 40:1–31; Is 49:14–51:16; Is 59:9–15; Is 60:1–18; Is 63:15–64:12; Je 8:4–17; Je 14:1–22; Je 17:1–13; Je 23:9–40; Je 29:1–32; Je 31:15–22; La 3:22–42; Eze 37:1–14; Ho 2:14–23; Mic 7:8–13; Zec 9:11–17; Mt 12:14–21; Lk 23:8–12; Lk 24:13–32; Jn 5:39–47; Ac 2:14–39; Ac 22:30–23:10; Ac 24:10–27; Ac 26:1–11; Ac 28:17–31; Ro 4:13–5:5; Ro 8:18–30; Ro 12:9–21; Ro 15:1–13; Ro 15:22–33; 1 Co 9:1–18; 1 Co 13:1–13; 1 Co 15:12–19; 1 Co 16:5–12; 2 Co 1:3–11; 2 Co 3:7–18; 2 Co 5:9–11; 2 Co 10:12–18; 2 Co 13:1–6; Ga 5:1–6; Eph 1:3–23; Eph 2:11–13; Eph 4:1–6; Php 1:19–26; Php 2:19–24; Col 1:3–8; Col 1:19–29; 1 Th 1:2–10; 1 Th 2:17–20; 1 Th 4:13–5:11; 2 Th 2:13–17; 1 Ti 1:1–2; 1 Ti 3:14–16; 1 Ti 4:6–11; 1 Ti 5:3–16; 1 Ti 6:17–19; Tt 1:1–4; Tt 2:11–3:8; Phm 17–22; Heb 3:1–6; Heb 6:9–20; Heb 7:11–19; Heb 10:19–25; Heb 11:1–3; 1 Pe 1:3–21; 1 Pe 3:1–6; 1 Pe 3:13–17; 1 Jn 2:28–3:3; 2 Jn 12–13;