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Hinge
Buildings and structures
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hinge
Hinge[Heb sîr; Akk. ṣirru]. The Hebrew term in Prov. 26:14 refers to some device that enabled a door to turn on a pivot, and thus be opened or closed. Specimen hinges from ancient Near Eastern sites include metal bars having a piece at one end which projects downward at a right angle, so as to fit
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Hinge
Using the ancient “pole pieces”, a modern gate has been installed at the north gate of Mycenae. HFVHINGE. Two words are translated “hinge” in KJV. The Heb. word pōt probably means “socket. (1 Kgs 7:50), and ṣı̂r refers to the “pivot” or pole piece of the ancient Palestinian door (Prov 26:14).In
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Hinge
Hinge. Both ancient Egyptian and modern Oriental doors were and are hung by means of pivots turning in sockets on both the upper and lower sides. 1 Kings 7:50. In Syria, and especially the Haurân, there are many ancient doors consisting of stone slabs with pivots carved out of the same piece, inserted
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Hinges
HINGES. The rendering of two Heb. words, namely, ṣı̂r, to “open,” Prov. 26:14, and pōth literally an “interstice,” 1 Kings 7:50 (NIV, “sockets”). Doors in the East turn on pivots rather than on what we call hinges. They were sometimes made of metal (e.g., Solomon had hinges in the Temple made of gold)
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Hinge
Hinge(Heb. tsir, that on which a door revolves. “Doors in the East turn rather on pivots than on what we term hinges. In Syria, and especially in the Hauran, there are many ancient doors, consisting of stone slabs with pivots carved out of the same piece inserted in sockets above and below, and fixed
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Hinge
HINGE — a pin and socket arrangement on which a door of Bible times turned as it was opened and closed. Doors in ancient times did not have hinges as we know them today. Instead they had projecting pins at both the top and bottom on the side where the door swung open. These pins fitted into matching
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HINGE
HINGE<hinj> ([פֹּת‎, poth]): Hinges of Jewish sacred buildings in Scripture are mentioned only in connection with Solomon’s temple. Here those for the doors, both of the oracle and of the outer temple, are said to have been of gold (1 Ki 7:50). By this is probably to be understood that the pivots upon
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Hinge
HINGE Flexible device on which a door turns. Proverbs 26:14 compares a lazy person turning in bed to a door, turning on its hinges. The meaning of the term translated hinges at 1 Kings 7:50 (KJV, NASB, TEV) is disputed. NIV, NRSV prefer the translation sockets on the grounds that ancient doors swung
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Hinge
hinge. This English term, referring to a device that allows a door or lid to turn, is used rarely in Bible versions (e.g., to render the unique Hebrew word ṣîr H7494, Prov. 26:14). Most of the ancient hinges were of a pivot type that would fit into a socket (cf. 1 Ki. 7:50 KJV).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Hinge
HINGE, hinj (פֹּת‎, pōth): Hinges of Jewish sacred buildings in Scripture are mentioned only in connection with Solomon’s temple. Here those for the doors, both of the oracle and of the outer temple, are said to have been of gold (1 K 7:50). By this is probably to be understood that the pivots upon which
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
HINGE
HINGE [צִירtsir]. A metal pole or pivot attached to a DOOR and fitted into a SOCKET, enabling the door to swing open or shut. Proverbs 26:14 compares the lazy person turning in bed to a door turning on its hinges.