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Herod’s Praetorium
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The official residence of a Roman governor. The word originally referred to the building or tent that served as the headquarters for military generals, governors, and traveling officials (compare Caesar, De bello civili. 1.76.2; 3.82.1; Cicero, Div. 1.72.33; In Verrem. 2.4.65).The word “praetorium” is a Latin loanword transliterated into Greek as πραιτώριον (praitōrion). It is derived from the word praetor, meaning “magistrate” or “commander.” It occurs eight times in the New Testament (Matt 27:27; Mark 15:16; John 18:28, 33, 19:9; Acts 23:35; Phil 1:13). In each of these occurrences the context suggests that the praetorium served as the residence for Roman officials.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Praetorium
Praetorium The official residence of a Roman governor. The word originally referred to the building or tent that served as the headquarters for military generals, governors, and traveling officials (compare Caesar, De bello civili. 1.76.2; 3.82.1; Cicero, Div. 1.72.33; In Verrem. 2.4.65).The word “praetorium”
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Praetorium
PRAETORIUM [Gk praitōrion (πραιτωριον)]. The name given to the headquarters of the praefectus praetorii, a Roman official who resided as the supreme administrator and judge of a region. The praetorium was usually, but not necessarily, also the living quarters (Gk oikia) of the prefect or governor.Several
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Praetorian Guard
Praetorium, Praetorian Guard. Term which appears in the Greek NT in Mark 15:16; Matthew 27:27; John 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35; and Philippians 1:13. It is a Latin word borrowed from the usage of the Romans who dominated the Mediterranean world in NT times. It was used primarily in military and governmental
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Judgment Hall
Judgment HallThe AV translation of Gk. praitṓrion in Jn. 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35. Elsewhere the AV renders “Praetorium” (Mk. 15:16) and “the common hall” (Mt. 27:27). The RSV renders “praetorium” in every case except Phil. 1:13, where it reads “praetorian guard.”See Praetorium.
Praetorium
Praetorium prē-tôrʹē-əm, prī-tôrʹē-əm; PRAETORIAN GUARD prē-tôrʹē-ən, prī-tôrʹē-ən [Gk. praitó̄rion, Lat praetorium]; AV also COMMON HALL (Mt. 27:27), HALL OF JUDGMENT (Jn. 18:28), JUDGMENT HALL (Jn. 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35), PALACE (Phil. 1:13); NEB (GOVERNOR’S) HEADQUARTERS. The term
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Judgment, Hall of
JUDGMENT*, HALL OF kjv translation in Jn 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35 of a NT word also translated “Praetorium” (Mk 15:16) and “common hall” (Mt 27:27). The word was first used to refer to the place where the Roman general’s tent stood in an army camp and hence was a reference to the headquarters of the
Praetorium, Praetorian Guard
PRAETORIUM*, PRAETORIAN GUARD* Term appearing in the Greek NT in Mark 15:16; Matthew 27:27; John 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35; and Philippians 1:13. It is a Latin word borrowed from the Romans, who dominated the Mediterranean world in NT times. It was used primarily in military and governmental affairs.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Praetorium
PRAETORIUM. This originally Latin term comes from praetor, “leader,” “head,” “chief,” and appears in later Gr. First it signified the tent of the praetor (general) in a Roman army camp (Livy, Hist. vii. 12; x.23). Then it denoted the general’s officers who assembled in his tent as a council (Livy, Hist
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Praetorium
PRAETORIUM. Originally the tent of the commander, or praetor, and, in consequence, the army headquarters (Livy, 7. 12; Caesar, Bellum Civile 1. 76). By extension the word came to mean the residence of a provincial governor (Mt. 27:27; Mk. 15:16; Jn. 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35). If Paul was writing from
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Praetorium
PraetoriumOriginally a general’s tent, the word “praetorium” in NT times was commonly used of the residence of a provincial governor (Acts 23:35; cf. Phil. 1:13).The Gospels report that Jesus was interrogated by Pontius Pilate at “the praetorium” (Gk. aulē, “palace”; Mark 15:16; cf. Matt. 27:27; John
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Praetorium
Praetorium [prī tôrˊĭ əm] (Gk. praitṓrion; Lat. praetorium).† Originally the tent of the general (Lat. praetor) in a Roman army camp, the term came to be designate the residence of any provincial governor (or “magistrate”) or, by extension, any magnificent building.Jesus’ trial before Pilate
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Praetorium
PRAETORIUM The headquarters of the praetorian prefect, a Roman official or governor who served in a region of the Roman Empire. The New Testament refers to several such residences. The praetorium of Pilate in Jerusalem is the place where Jesus’s trial was conducted (Matt 27:27; Mark 15:16; John 18:28,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Prætorium
Præto´rium (in the Revised Version translated palace, Matt. 27:27; John 18:28, 33; 19:9), the headquarters of the Roman military governor, wherever he happened to be. In time of peace some one of the best buildings of the city which was the residence of the proconsul or prætor was selected for this purpose.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Praetorium
PRAETO´RIUM (pre-tōʹri-um; Gk. praitorion, Matt. 27:27; Mark 15:16; sometimes “judgment hall,” KJV).1. The headquarters in a Roman camp, the tent of the commander in chief.2. The palace in which the governor or procurator of a province resided (John 18:28, 33; 19:9; Acts 23:35). At Jerusalem the Praetorium
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