Loading…
Hena
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hena
Hena (הֵנַע‎, hena'). A city captured by Assyria. The ambassador for Sennacherib (king of Assyria) uses the fate of Hena (along with other cities) as a warning to King Hezekiah. He insists that Assyria will conquer Jerusalem too (2 Kgs 18:34; 19:13; Isa 37:13).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hena (Place)
HENA (PLACE) [Heb hēnaʿ (הֵנַע)]. Assyria under Shalmaneser V (726–722) and Sargon II (721–705) conquered Samaria and took tribute from Judah’s king Ahaz (733–727). Hezekiah (727–698) continued the tribute, but when Sargon died, Hezekiah rebelled against Assyria. The Assyrian King Sennacherib (704–681)
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Hena
Hena. One of the six cities that Rabshakeh boasted fell before the armies of Sennacherib, in spite of their gods (2 Kgs 18:34). Rabshakeh hoped the example of these cities would strike fear in King Hezekiah’s heart and make him doubt the Lord’s deliverance as the same hordes surrounded Jerusalem. The
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hena
Hena henʹə, hḕnä [Heb. hēna&#ʿ; Gk. Ana]. One of the Syrian cities captured by Sennacherib and given as a warning of the coming fate of Jerusalem (2 K. 18:34; 19:13). Its location remains unknown, but evidently it was near the north Syrian provinces of Arpad and Hamath.Cheyne (EB, s.v.) rejected
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Hena
HENA One of the six cities that the rabshakeh boasted fell before the armies of Sennacherib, in spite of their gods (2 Kgs 18:34). Rabshakeh hoped the example of these cities would strike fear in King Hezekiah’s heart and make him doubt the Lord’s deliverance as the same hordes surrounded Jerusalem.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Hena
HENA. A city conquered by Assyria, its exact location unknown. Since the name means “low” and the city is mentioned with two other cities on the Orontes River, Hamath and Arpad, Hena probably was in the same general area (2 Kgs 18:34; 19:13; Isa 37:13).
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Hena
HENA. A city whose god, the Assyrians boasted, could not save it (2 Ki. 18:34). It is identified by lxx with Ana on the Euphrates. Hena and Ivvah have been identified as Arab. star names, and consequently taken as the names of deities. This is, however, unlikely, as the latter is almost certainly a place-name
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hena
Hena (Heb. hēnaʿ)A city named in accounts of Sennacherib’s attempt to persuade the king of Judah to surrender (2 Kgs. 18:34; 19:13 = Isa. 37:13). It is cited as a city whose gods were unable to prevent conquest by the Assyrians. Although the location is unknown, it is listed with Hamath and Arpad,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hena
Hena [hĕnˊə] (Heb. hēna˓). A Syrian city conquered by sennacherib in 838 B.C. and incorporated along with the surrounding territory into the Assyrian Empire, thus held up as a warning of the imminent doom of Jerusalem (2 Kgs. 18:34; 19:13; Isa. 37:13). In the LXX it is called Gk. Ana or Anag,
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Hena
He´na (troubling), a city the Assyrian kings had reduced shortly before the time of Sennacherib. 2 Kings 19:13; Isa. 37:13. At no great distance from Sippara (now Mosaib) is an ancient town called Ana or Anah, which may be the same as Hena. It is 20 miles from Babylon, on the Euphrates.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Hena
HE´NA (hēʹna; signification unknown). A city, probably in Mesopotamia, mentioned in connection with Hamath, Arpad, etc., as having been overthrown by Sennacherib before his invasion of Judea (2 Kings 18:34; 19:13; Isa. 37:13). It is probably the city of Ana on the Euphrates.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Hena
Henaone of the cities of Mesopotamia destroyed by sennacherib (2 Kings 18:34; 19:13). It is identified with the modern Anah, lying on the right bank of the Euphrates, not far from Sepharvaim.