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Hell
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The Greek word is often translated in English versions of the New Testament as “hell.” It is a noun derived from the Hebrew phrase גיא הנום‎ (gy' hnwm), which means “Valley of Hinnom.” The Valley of Hinnom was a ravine along the southern slope of Jerusalem (Josh 15:18; 18:16). In Old Testament times, it was a place used for offering sacrifices to foreign gods. Eventually, the site was used to burn refuse. When the Jews discussed punishment in the afterlife, they employed the image of this smoldering waste dump.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hell
Hell (γέεννα, geenna). The Greek word is often translated in English versions of the New Testament as “hell.” It is a noun derived from the Hebrew phrase גיא הנום‎ (gy' hnwm), which means “Valley of Hinnom.” The Valley of Hinnom was a ravine along the southern slope of Jerusalem (Josh 15:18; 18:16). In
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hades, Hell
HADES, HELL. The Greek word Hades (ha̧dēs) is sometimes, but misleadingly, translated “hell” in English versions of the NT. It refers to the place of the dead but not necessarily to a place of torment for the wicked dead. In Greek religious thought Hades was the god of the underworld; but more commonly
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hell
Hell[Gk géenna, tartaróō—‘hold captive in Tartarus’]. On Gk. géenna, see Gehenna. In the NT Gk. tartaróō occurs only in 2 Pet. 2:4, where the angels who sinned were “cast … into hell” (cf. RSV mg and NAB). The verb tartaróō is derived from the noun Tartaros (cf. LXX Job 40:20; 41:24 [Eng. 32];
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Hell
HELL Place of future punishment for the lost, unrepentant, wicked dead.PreviewDefinition and DescriptionBiblical TermsThe Justice of Eternal PunishmentDefinition and Description Hell is the final destiny of unbelievers and is variously described by the figures of a furnace of fire, eternal fire,
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Hell
hell, a place of eternal punishment for the wicked. In the nrsv, the word “hell” is only used in the nt, where it translates Greek gehenna. It is thus distinct from Sheol and Hades, names for the realm of the dead that the nrsv simply transliterates from Hebrew and Greek respectively. Some English translations,
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Hell
HELL. In common and theological usage, the place of future punishment of the wicked dead. However, since the KJV uses “hell” to signify the grave and the place of disembodied spirits, both good and bad, care must be taken to prevent mistakes and confusion.Hell, in the sense of a place of future punishment,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Hell
HELL. ‘Hell’ in the NT renders the Gk. word transliterated as ‘Gehenna’ (Mt. 5:22, 29–30; 10:28; 18:9; 23:15, 33; Mk. 9:43, 45, 47; Lk. 12:5; Jas. 3:6). The name is derived from the Heb. (ben) (be) hinnōm, the Valley of (the son[s] of Hinnom, a valley near Jerusalem (Jos. 15:8; 18:16), where children
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hell
HellAn English word used to translate four biblical terms. Heb. šĕʾôl and Gk. hádēs generally refer to the world of the dead. Tartarus (cf. Gk. tartaróō, 2 Pet. 2:4) is the place of punishment for fallen angels awaiting final judgment. Gk. géenna is the place and condition of just retribution
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hell
Hell. †The English word “hell,” as employed in the KJV, translates four words in the original biblical languages: Heb. še˒ôl, and Gk. hádēs, géenna (Gehenna) and tartaróō (a reference to Tartarus). The RSV transliterates as Sheol and Hades; these names generally signify the abode of
Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels
Heaven and Hell
Heaven and hellBeyond the common reference to the physical “sky,” the Gospels use heaven to refer both to the abode of God*, as well as to the place of eternal habitation for those who obey God and follow Jesus. The Gospels use the concept of hell to refer to the place of punishment for those who
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Hell, Abyss, Eternal Punishment
Hell, Abyss, Eternal PunishmentA belief in divine punishment after death was widespread in Jewish and Greco-Roman thought. In our literature one finds the specific expectation of everlasting torment by the one righteous God, directed against all who are outside of Christ. The canon of Scripture and
Key passages
Mt 13:40–42

Thus just as the darnel is gathered and burned with fire, so it will be at the end of the age. The Son of Man will send out his angels and they will gather out of his kingdom all the causes of sin and those who do lawless deeds, and throw them into the fiery furnace. In that place there will …

Mk 9:43–48

And if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off! It is better for you to enter into life crippled than, having two hands, to go into hell—into the unquenchable fire! And if your foot causes you to sin, cut it off! It is better for you to enter into life lame than, having two feet, to be thrown …

Lk 12:4–5

“And I tell you, my friends, do not be afraid of those who kill the body, and after these things do not have anything more to do. But I will show you whom you should fear: fear the one who has authority, after the killing, to throw you into hell! Yes, I tell you, fear …

Jud 7

as Sodom and Gomorrah and the towns around them indulged in sexual immorality and pursued unnatural desire in the same way as these, are exhibited as an example by undergoing the punishment of eternal fire.

Re 20:14–15

And Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. This is the second death—the lake of fire. And if anyone was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire.

See also