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Heliodorus
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
An official in the court of the Seleucid king Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175 bc). After being falsely informed that the temple in Jerusalem contained untold riches, Seleucus sent Heliodorus to confiscate the wealth (2 Macc 3:4–7; see also 4 Macc 4). Heliodorus discovered that the temple did not contain the great wealth they expected, but he was still determined to confiscate the money for Seleucus (2 Macc 3:9–21). Heliodorus entered the temple treasury, but he was stopped by divine intervention—the appearance of a great horse carrying a fearsome rider with gold weapons, accompanied by two young men. Heliodorus was badly beaten by the horse and the young men (2 Macc 3:22–28). He recovered after the high priest, Onias, prayed for him; Heliodorus then returned to Syria without the money (2 Macc 3:29–40).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Heliodorus
Heliodorus (Ἡλιόδωρος, Hēliodōros). An official in the court of the Seleucid king Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175 bc). After being falsely informed that the temple in Jerusalem contained untold riches, Seleucus sent Heliodorus to confiscate the wealth (2 Macc 3:4–7; see also 4 Macc 4). Heliodorus discovered
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Heliodorus (Person)
HELIODORUS (PERSON) [Gk Hēliodōros (Ἡλιοδωρος)]. According to 2 Maccabees 3, Heliodorus, an official of the Seleucid court, was sent by Seleucus IV Philopater to confiscate funds from the Temple in Jerusalem. Simon, the administrator of the Temple, conspired with the Seleucid governor of Coele Syria
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Heliodorus
Heliodorus he-li-ə-dōʹʹrəs [Gk. Hēliodōros]. Treasurer of the Syrian king Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175 b.c.), the immediate predecessor of Antiochus Epiphanes who carried out to its utmost extremity the hellenizing policy begun by Seleucus and the “sons of Tobias.” Greatly in need of money to
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Heliodorus
HELIODORUS There is an inscription in the temple of Apollo at Delos that indicates that Heliodorus was prominent in the court of the Seleucid king Seleucus IV Philopator, who reigned from 187 to 175 bc. In his Syrian Wars (45) Appian says that Heliodorus was a close friend of this king. According to
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Heliodorus
Heliodorus (Gk. Hēliodōros)An official of the Seleucid court who was sent by Seleucus IV to confiscate money from the Jerusalem temple after a Jew named Simon informed Apollonius, the governor of Coele-Syria, that the temple held great wealth (2 Macc. 3). Simon’s action resulted from a long rivalry
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Heliodorus
Heliodorus [hēˊlĭ ə dôrˊəs] (Gk. Hēliodōros “gift of Helios [or the sun]”). † A high official of the Syrian king Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175 B.C.) dispatched to confiscate the temple treasury at Jerusalem, a depository for the funds of widows and orphans (2 Macc. 3:7–14). In response to
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Heliodorus
HELIODORUS Minister of Seleucus IV Philopator, king of Syria (r. 187–175 b.c.). According to 2 Maccabees 3, he was sent by Seleucus to plunder the Temple treasury in Jerusalem and bring it to Antioch. While in the Temple treasury, however, Heliodorus was prevented from his crime by a mysterious rider
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HELIODORUS
HELIODORUS<he-li-o-do’-rus> ([Ἡλιόδωρος, Heliodoros]): Treasurer of the Syrian king Seleucus IV, Philopator (187-175 BC), the immediate predecessor of Antiochus Epiphanes who carried out to its utmost extremity the Hellenizing policy begun by Seleucus and the “sons of Tobias.” Greatly in want of
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
HELIODORUS
HELIODO′RUS (Ἡλιόδωρος), the treasurer of Seleucus Philopator, king of Syria, murdered his master, and attempted to seize the crown for himself, but was expelled by Eumenes and Attalus, of Pergamus, who established Antiochus Epiphanes in the kingdom, b. c. 175. (Appian, Syr. 45; Liv. xli. 24.) The
HELIODO′RUS (Ἡλιόδωρος)
HELIODO′RUS (Ἡλιόδωρος), literary:—1. Poets. 1. Of Athens. A tragedian, and author of a poem entitled ἀπολυτικά, from which Galen quotes some verses about poisons. (De Antidot. ii. 7, vol. xiv. p. 145; Welcker, die Griech. Tragöd. p. 1323.)2. The author of a poem entitled Protesilaus, from which
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Heliodorus
Heliodorus hee’lee-uh-dor’uhs (Ἡλιόδωρος, “gift of Helios [the sun god]”). The chief minister of King Seleucus IV Philopator (187–175 B.C.). He tried unsuccessfully to plunder the treasury of the temple in Jerusalem (2 Macc. 3:7–40; 4:1; 5:18). A Jew named Simon had a disagreement with the high priest
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Heliodorus
HELIODORUS, hē-li-ō̇-dōʹrus (Ἡλιόδωρος, Hēliódōros): Treasurer of the Syrian king Seleucus IV, Philopator (187–175 BC), the immediate predecessor of Antiochus Epiphanes who carried out to its utmost extremity the Hellenizing policy begun by Seleucus and the “sons of Tobias.” Greatly in want of
All the People in the Bible: An A–Z Guide to the Saints, Scoundrels, and Other Characters in Scripture
Heliodorus
Heliodorus [hē-li-uh-dor-us] Ἡλιόδωρος, “Gift of the Sun”): a high official under the Syrian king Seleucus IV Philopator (2 Macc. 3:1)
Heliodorus (175 BCE)
Heliodorus (175 bce)Heliodorus was a personal friend of Seleucus IV Philopator and a high official in his court.Philopator was in desperate need of money, and he sent Heliodorus to loot the temple in Jerusalem (2 Macc. 3:7ff.). Heliodorus was graciously received by the high priest Onias III, a faithful
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