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Head of grain
Plants
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Corn
Corn. Word used in the kjv to denote grain, especially wheat. Maize, the plant known in America as corn, was unknown in the Middle East in biblical times.See Plants (Barley; Wheat).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Grain
Grain A number of Hebrew words are used to describe the edible grains of certain cultivated crops. The AV employed the old English generic term “corn” to translate the various words, but the current association of corn with maize makes this undesirable.The Heb. bar, dāg̱ān (Ugar. dgn), and šeḇer
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Corn
CORN Word often used to denote grain, especially wheat. Maize, the plant known in America as corn, was unknown in the Middle East in biblical times. See Plants (Barley; Wheat).
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Corn
corn, a term used generically in the kjv and neb for cereal crops in the Bible (nrsv: “grain”). See also grain.
Grain
grain, a general term used throughout the Bible to indicate the seed of cultivated cereal grasses such as wheat, barley, millet, and sorghum. The term the nrsv regularly translates as “grain” is translated “corn” in the kjv and neb. Ground into flour, grain was the major component of breads and other
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Corn
CORNA term found in Bibles published in England (KJV, NEB, etc.) It is the translation of several Heb. and Gr. words for cereal grains such as wheat and barley (e.g., Gen 27:28; 41:35; 42:1; Deut 16:9; Mt 12:1). Modern American versions usually have “grain” where KJV has “corn”. The term must not be
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Grain
GRAIN. The commonest OT Heb. words are 1. dāgān, wheat (fully-developed grain). 2. bar, grain of any kind standing in the open field (hence bar means also ‘open country’). 3. šeḇer, grain, cereal, victuals, i.e. broken crushed grain.‘Parched grain’ (qālî, qālâ, ‘roasted’) were ears or grains
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Grain
GrainGrain production relies on field crops such as cereals (Heb. dāg̱ān), legumes, and other cultigens. The main cereals cultivated in the Near East are wheat (ḥiṭṭâ) and barley (kĕʿōrâ). Another group of small-grained cereal plants is known by the collective term millet, and includes broomcorn
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ear of Grain;
Ear of Grain; Individual heads of grain (Mark 4:28; Gk. stáchys), either of barley (Exod. 9:31; Heb. ˒ābîb) or of wheat (Deut. 23:25; Heb. melîlâ, but never of corn. See Grain.
Grain
Grain. The cultivation of grain began early in Palestine’s history, both in the steppe regions, which were the first to be settled, and in the wooded areas. Fields were planted mainly with barley and wheat, but the cultivation of millet and spelt is also mentioned (Isa. 28:25; Ezek. 4:9). Grain was grown
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Corn
Corn. The most common kinds were wheat, barley, spelt, Authorized Version, Ex. 9:32 and Isa. 28:25, “rye”; Ezek. 4:9 “fitches” and millet; oats are mentioned only by rabbinical writers. Our Indian corn was unknown in Bible times. Corn-crops are still reckoned at twenty-fold what was sown, and were anciently
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Grain
GRAIN (Heb. ṣrōr, “packed,” i.e., “kernel”; Gk. kokkos, “kernel”). Used (Amos 9:9; 1 Cor. 15:37; etc.) in the singular and not as we do in a collective sense. See also Vegetable Kingdom: Corn.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Corn
CornThe word so rendered (dagan) in Gen. 27:28, 37, Num. 18:27, Deut. 28:51, Lam. 2:12, is a general term representing all the commodities we usually describe by the words corn, grain, seeds, peas, beans. With this corresponds the use of the word in John 12:24.In Gen. 41:35, 49, Prov. 11:26, Joel 2:24
Grain
Grainused, in Amos 9:9, of a small stone or kernel; in Matt. 13:31, of an individual seed of mustard; in John 12:24, 1 Cor. 15:37, of wheat. The Hebrews sowed only wheat, barley, and spelt; rye and oats are not mentioned in Scripture.
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Corn
Corncorn, a term used generically in the kjv and neb for cereal crops in the ot (rsv: ‘grain’). An ancient poem designates the Promised Land a place of ‘corn and new wine’ (Deut. 33:28). The noun phrase ‘corn, new wine, and oil’ occurs frequently in the ot and denotes the range of native agricultural
Grain
Graingrain, a general term used throughout the Bible to indicate the seed of cultivated cereal grasses such as wheat, barley, millet, and sorghum. Ground into flour, it was the major component of breads and other cooked foods. See also Barley; Corn; Millet; Rye; Spelt; Wheat.