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Head of John the Baptist
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
John the Baptist
John the Baptist Son of Zechariah and Elizabeth. Relative of Jesus Christ. Baptized people for repentance of their sins. Beheaded by Herod Antipas at the request of his stepdaughter/niece.
John the Baptist, Critical Issues
John the Baptist, Critical Issues An overview of John’s depiction by the Gospel writers and the cultural context for him and his message.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
John the Baptist
JOHN THE BAPTIST. A 1st-century Jewish oracular prophet significant in the NT as a precursor of Jesus. John the Baptist was an ascetic, and conducted a ministry in the Judean wilderness that involved preaching and baptism. His popularity and the revolutionary possibilities of his message of social justice
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Beheading
Beheading. Form of execution practiced in Bible times.See Criminal Law and Punishment.
Head
Head. Term with many figurative uses in Scripture. Frequently it designates prominence or authority. The OT commonly uses parts of the body to refer to the whole person (e.g., Dt 6:5). Thus, the number of soldiers in an army or the inhabitants of a nation could be determined by a “head count” (Nm 1:2).
John the Baptist
John the Baptist. Forerunner of the Messiah who prepared the people for Jesus’ coming, proclaimed the need for forgiveness of sins, and offered a baptism symbolizing repentance. His ministry included the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, where he testified to Jesus being the Expected One from God.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Head
Head[Heb barzel] (Dt. 19:5; 2 K. 6:5); [gulgōleṯ] (Ex. 38:26; Nu. 1:2, 18, 20, 22; 1 Ch. 10:10); AV also MAN, POLLS; NEB also SKULL; [lehāḇâ] (1 S. 17:7); [lip̣nê] (“at the head,” Dt. 3:28; 10:11; 31:3; Jgs. 3:27; 9:39; 2 S. 10:16; 1 Ch. 19:16; Zec. 12:8); AV “before”; NEB also “across,” “before,”
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Beheading
BEHEADING Form of execution practiced in Bible times. See Criminal Law and Punishment.
Head
HEAD The uppermost portion of the body, containing the brain, major sense organs, and the mouth. It appears many times in the Bible as a physical description. The Hebrew term for head is also used figuratively in the Old Testament. Frequently, it designates prominence or authority.To raise one’s head
John the Baptist
JOHN THE BAPTIST Forerunner of the Messiah who prepared the people for Jesus’ coming, proclaimed the need for forgiveness of sins, and offered a baptism symbolizing repentance. His ministry included the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, where he testified to Jesus being the Expected One from God.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Head
head. Most occurrences of the word “head” (Heb. rosh; Gk. kephalē) in the Bible are literal, referring to the anatomical part of the body (e.g., Israel laid his hand “on the head of Ephraim,” Gen. 48:14). Even then, however, actions involving the head have figurative meaning. Either covering one’s head
John
John (jahn).1 The father of Mattathias and grandfather of Judas Maccabeus (1 Macc. 2:1).2 The oldest son of Mattathias and brother of Judas Maccabeus (1 Macc. 2:2; 9:35–42).3 John the Baptist (Matt. 3:1). See John the Baptist.4 John the son of Zebedee, also called John the apostle (Mark 10:35). See
John the Baptist
John the Baptist, or John the Baptizer, an important figure in each of the four nt Gospels. He is identified with the beginning of Jesus’s ministry and understood to be the forerunner of Jesus the Messiah. Reference to John is the first point of convergence among the canonical Gospels, all of which give
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Head
HEAD. There are several uses of the word head. 1. It denotes the most essential part of man and beast. It is used of the serpent’s head (Gen 3:15), sacrificial animals (Ex 29:10, 15, 19), and human beings (Gen 40:16–17). The head is considered the seat of the intelligence and sometimes represents the
John the Baptist
JOHN THE BAPTIST. Born (c. 7 b.c.) of elderly parents, Zacharias and Elisabeth, both of whom were of a priestly family, John grew up in the wilderness of Judea (Lk 1:80), and there (c. a.d. 27) he was called to his prophetic ministry (Lk 3:2). Under what influence he lived during his formative years
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Head
HEAD. The head (Heb. rô’š; Gk. kephalē is not regarded as the seat of the intellect, but as the source of life (Mt. 14:8, 11; Jn. 19:30). Thus to lift up the head is to grant life in the sense of success (Jdg. 8:28; Ps. 27:6; Gn. 40:13, but cf. the pun in v. 19), or to expect it in God himself (Ps.
John the Baptist
JOHN THE BAPTIST. Born (c. 7 bc) to an elderly couple, Zechariah a priest and his wife Elizabeth, he grew to manhood in the wilderness of Judaea (Lk. 1:80), where he received his prophetic call, c. ad 27 (Lk. 3:2). The view that his wilderness period was spent in association with the Qumran community
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Head
HeadGenerally the head of the physical body, the seat of the sensory organs and the brain (Heb. rōʾš; Gk. kephalḗ). Several passages allude to particular customs pertaining to the head. The covering of one’s head was an act of contrition (2 Sam. 15:30) or shame (Jer. 14:3). Casting dust upon the
John
John (Gk. Iōánnēs)1. The father of Matthias and grandfather of Judas Maccabeus; son of the priest Simeon (1 Macc. 2:1).2. The oldest son of Matthias, surnamed Gaddi (2 Macc. 2:2). Sent to the Nabateans by his brother Jonathan to store the Maccabeans’ belongings, he was ambushed and killed by “the
John the Baptist
John the BaptistJewish religious figure at the time of Jesus, executed by Herod Antipas (4 b.c.e.–39 c.e.).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Head
Head (Heb. rō˒š; Gk. kephalḗ).† In literal usage, the uppermost division of the body, both of humans (e.g., Gen. 49:16; Matt. 5:36) and of animals (e.g., Lev. 3:8; 2 Kgs. 6:25). By extension, the term also designates the top portion of inanimate objects (e.g., 1 Sam. 5:4; Ps. 24:7, 9).To the
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters
Head
HeadPaul used the term kephalē (“head”) in ways that demonstrate a variety of meanings, sometimes blending both literal and figurative values in a single passage. In some texts he suggests more than one meaning for the word. “Head” is for him in the first place a literal member of the body (1 Cor 12:21),
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