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Head
Body and body parts
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Head
Head. Term with many figurative uses in Scripture. Frequently it designates prominence or authority. The OT commonly uses parts of the body to refer to the whole person (e.g., Dt 6:5). Thus, the number of soldiers in an army or the inhabitants of a nation could be determined by a “head count” (Nm 1:2).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Head
Head[Heb barzel] (Dt. 19:5; 2 K. 6:5); [gulgōleṯ] (Ex. 38:26; Nu. 1:2, 18, 20, 22; 1 Ch. 10:10); AV also MAN, POLLS; NEB also SKULL; [lehāḇâ] (1 S. 17:7); [lip̣nê] (“at the head,” Dt. 3:28; 10:11; 31:3; Jgs. 3:27; 9:39; 2 S. 10:16; 1 Ch. 19:16; Zec. 12:8); AV “before”; NEB also “across,” “before,”
Crown of the Head
Crown of the Head [Heb. qoḏqōḏ] (Dt. 28:35; 33:16, 20; 2 S. 14:25; Job 2:7; Ps. 68:21; Jer. 2:16; 48:45); AV also SCALP, TOP OF THE HEAD; NEB also BROW, SCALP, etc. This term, equivalent to the Akk. qaqqādu and the Ugar. qdqd, means properly “vertex,” and so in the AV and RSV is usually rendered
Forehead
Forehead [Heb. mēṣaḥ (e.g., Ex. 28:38), gibbē (a)ḥ (Lev. 13:41–43), pēʾâ (Nu. 24:17; Jer. 48:45), bên ʿênêḵem—‘between your eyes’ (Dt. 14:1); Gk. métōpon (e.g., Rev. 7:3)]; AV also BROW, “corner,” “between your eyes”, etc.; NEB also “squadrons” (Nu. 24:17), FORELOCK, etc.The word occurs
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Head
HEAD The uppermost portion of the body, containing the brain, major sense organs, and the mouth. It appears many times in the Bible as a physical description. The Hebrew term for head is also used figuratively in the Old Testament. Frequently, it designates prominence or authority.To raise one’s head
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Head
head. Most occurrences of the word “head” (Heb. rosh; Gk. kephalē) in the Bible are literal, referring to the anatomical part of the body (e.g., Israel laid his hand “on the head of Ephraim,” Gen. 48:14). Even then, however, actions involving the head have figurative meaning. Either covering one’s head
Forehead
forehead, the portion of the face between eyebrows and hairline. The Bible depicts the forehead or brow as a significant spot due to its location and visibility. As represented in ancient Near Eastern art, the upper portion of the forehead was often covered by hair, a headband, or some type of head covering;
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Head
HEAD. There are several uses of the word head. 1. It denotes the most essential part of man and beast. It is used of the serpent’s head (Gen 3:15), sacrificial animals (Ex 29:10, 15, 19), and human beings (Gen 40:16–17). The head is considered the seat of the intelligence and sometimes represents the
Forehead
FOREHEAD. This term is used frequently in its literal sense. Aaron and the high priests after him wore on their foreheads a gold plate (Ex 28:36, 38). The condition of the forehead aided the priest in determining leprosy (Lev 13:42–43; 2 Chr 26:20). David hit the forehead of Goliath with a stone (1 Sam
Scalp
SCALP. The crown of the head or the pate (Ps 68:21, Heb. qodqōd; cf. Gen 49:26; Job 2:7; Ps 7:16; etc.). The American Indian custom of taking scalps as trophies of war was not practiced in the ancient Near East. Instead, the Egyptians cut off the hands of their defeated enemies and counted these (ANEP
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Head
HEAD. The head (Heb. rô’š; Gk. kephalē is not regarded as the seat of the intellect, but as the source of life (Mt. 14:8, 11; Jn. 19:30). Thus to lift up the head is to grant life in the sense of success (Jdg. 8:28; Ps. 27:6; Gn. 40:13, but cf. the pun in v. 19), or to expect it in God himself (Ps.
Forehead
FOREHEAD (Heb. mēṣaḥ; Gk. metōpon, literally ‘between the eyes’). The set of the forehead can indicate opposition, defiance or rebellion (Je. 3:3, ‘brow’ in rsv), and hardness of the forehead indicates the determination or power to persevere in that attitude (Is. 48:4; Ezk. 3:8–9).The forehead,
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Head
HeadGenerally the head of the physical body, the seat of the sensory organs and the brain (Heb. rōʾš; Gk. kephalḗ). Several passages allude to particular customs pertaining to the head. The covering of one’s head was an act of contrition (2 Sam. 15:30) or shame (Jer. 14:3). Casting dust upon the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Head
Head (Heb. rō˒š; Gk. kephalḗ).† In literal usage, the uppermost division of the body, both of humans (e.g., Gen. 49:16; Matt. 5:36) and of animals (e.g., Lev. 3:8; 2 Kgs. 6:25). By extension, the term also designates the top portion of inanimate objects (e.g., 1 Sam. 5:4; Ps. 24:7, 9).To the
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters
Head
HeadPaul used the term kephalē (“head”) in ways that demonstrate a variety of meanings, sometimes blending both literal and figurative values in a single passage. In some texts he suggests more than one meaning for the word. “Head” is for him in the first place a literal member of the body (1 Cor 12:21),
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Head
HEAD The chief member of the body, understood in the Bible as the ruler of the other members, and used metaphorically for the place or person first in rank. In a tribe or a community, the “head” was the chief person (e.g., Exod 6:14). For Paul, Christ is the head of humanity, the Church, and “every ruler
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Forehead
Forehead. The practice of veiling the face (forehead) in public for women of the higher classes, especially married women, in the East, sufficiently stigmatizes with reproach the unveiled face of women of bad character. Gen. 24:65; Jer. 3:3. The custom among many Oriental nations both of coloring the
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Head
HEAD. This part of the body has generally been believed to be the seat of intelligence, whereas the heart, or the parts near it, were the place of the affections (Gen. 3:15; Ps. 3:3; Eccles. 2:14). In Scripture the head is sometimes used for the whole person (Gen. 49:26; Prov. 10:6), or for life itself
Forehead
FOREHEAD (Heb. mēṣaḥ, to “shine”). The practice of veiling the face in public for women of the higher classes—especially married women—in the East, sufficiently stigmatizes with reproach the unveiled faces of women of bad character (Gen. 24:65; Jer. 3:3). Reference is made to this when Israel is called
Scalp
SCALP (Heb. qodqōd). The crown (which see) of the head, the Heb. variously translated in the KJV, NASB, and NIV (Lev. 13:41; Ps. 68:21; Isa. 3:17; Jer. 48:45). Heb. qorḥâ, “baldness” (so KJV, NIV, Isa. 3:24) is rendered “plucked-out scalp” in the NASB.
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