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Hasideans
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hasidim
Hasidim (חֲסִידִים‎, chasidim; Ἁσιδαῖοι, Hasidaioi). A group of pious Jews who aided the Maccabees during the Maccabean revolt (ca. 167–160 bc) against the Seleucids (Josephus, Antiquities, XII. 7–10). Sometimes called Hasideans (1 Maccabees 2:42; 7:14; 2 Maccabees 14:6). Not to be confused with Hasidic
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hasideans
HASIDEANS [Gk Asidaioi (Ἀσιδαιοι)]. The name of a group of pious Jews noted for their loyalty to the Torah, some of whom united with the priest Mattathias and his sons in their resistance to the practices of the Seleucid rulers of Judah (1 Macc 2:42). The event which precipitated their joining Mattathias
Hasidim
HASIDIM [Gk Asidaioi (Ἀσιδαιοι)]. The name of a group of participants in the Maccabean Revolt mentioned in 1 Macc 2:42; 7:14; and 2 Macc 14:6 (RSV “Hasideans”). The Greek appellation is a transliteration of the Hebrew ḥăsı̂dı̂m (Hasidim) or the Aramaic ḥası̂dayyāʾ. While the name is rooted in the
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Hasidim
Hasidim. Transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning “the pious.” The influence of Greek customs and ways threatened the preservation of Jewish patterns of life in the 3rd and 4th centuries bc. Jews were required to employ the Greek language in their daily lives and with the language came the influence
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hasideans
Hasideans hasʹe-dēnʹenz; HASIDIM has-e-dēmʹ [Heb. asîḏîm; Gk. hasidaíoi]; AV ASSIDEANS. The Hebrew term is a masculine plural of ḥāsîḏ; it frequently means “pious” in the OT and is usually translated “Saints” (cf. 2 Ch. 6:41; Ps. 30:4 [MT 5]; 31:23 [MT 24]; 37:28; 50:5; etc.). The Greek
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Hasideans, Hasidim
HASIDEANS, HASIDIM* Transliterations of a Hebrew word meaning “the pious.” The influence of Greek customs and ways threatened the preservation of Jewish patterns of life in the third and fourth centuries bc. Jews were required to employ the Greek language in their daily lives, and with the language came
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Hasidaeans
HASIDAEANS. This is a transliteration of Hasidaioi in 1 Macc. 2:42; 7:13; 2 Macc. 14:6, though ‘Hasmonaeans’ may be the correct reading in the last case. rvmg. and modern literature prefer the underlying Heb. asîdîm. This term, meaning fundamentally ‘loyal ones’, is used frequently in the Psalms
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hasideans
Hasideans (Gk. Asidaɩ́oi) (also HASIDIM)A Jewish group in the 2nd century b.c.e. (1 Macc. 2:42; 7:13; 2 Macc. 14:6). Very little can be said with any certainty about the nature of this group and its role in the historical development of Judaism. The Greek term is a transliteration of Heb. ḥăsɩ̂ḏɩ̂m,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hasideans
Hasideans [hăsˊə dēˊənz] (Gk. hasidaíoi).† A pietistic Jewish movement which came to prominence in Palestine during the Hellenistic period. The name represents the Greek transliteration of Heb. asîḏîm “pious, devout,” a designation derived from ḥeseḏ “steadfast love, loving kindness”
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Hasideans
HASIDEANS (derived from Hebrew, “pious ones”) The name of a group of pious Jews at the time of the Maccabees who were noted for their fidelity to the Law and their support of the priest Mattathias and his sons in resisting the activities of the Seleucid overlords in Judah (1 Macc 2:42). Sixty of their
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Hasidaeans
Hasidaeans. The Greek form (Ἁσιδαῖοι) of the Heb. ‘*Chasidim’ (q.v.), found e.g. in 1 Macc. 2:42.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HASIDAEANS
HASIDAEANS<has-i-de’-anz> ([Ἁσιδαι̂οι, Hasidaioi], a transliteration of chacidhim, “the pious,” “Puritans”): A name assumed by the orthodox Jews (1 Macc 2:42; 7:13) to distinguish them from the Hellenizing faction described in the Maccabean books as the “impious,” the “lawless,” the “transgressors.”
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Hasideans
HASIDEANS (Hăs ə dēʹ ȧnz) Militant, religious community active in the Maccabean revolt (begun 168 b.c.). The group’s name derived from the OT concept of the Hasidim, the “saints” or “faithful.” The Pharisees and the Essenes likely derived from different streams of the Hasidean movement. See Intertestamental
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Topics & Themes