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Hare
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hare
Hare An animal that the Israelites were forbidden to eat because it does not have a cloven hoof (Lev 11:6; Deut 14:7).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Hare
Hare. Small, swift, long-eared mammal similar to the rabbit; condemned as unclean (Lv 11:6; Dt 14:7).See Animals.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hare
Hare[Heb ʾarneḇeṯ] (Lev. 11:6; Dt. 14:7); cf. Akk. annabu, Ugar. anhb, Arab ʾarnab. This animal is mentioned only in the lists of unclean animals in Leviticus and Deuteronomy, where it occurs along with the camel, the coney, and the swine. The camel, the hare, and the coney are unclean “because they
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Hare
HARE Small, swift, long-eared mammal similar to the rabbit (Lv 11:6; Dt 14:7). See Animals.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Hare
hare, any herbivorous rodent of the family Leporidae. Two varieties are especially attested in the Near East: the Lepus syriacus, which inhabits wooded areas, especially in the Esdraelon Valley, and the Lepus aegyptus, a smaller, sandy-colored animal found in the Negev and the Jordan Valley. The hare
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hare
HareA herbivorous rodent of the family Leporidae, a mammal closely related to the rabbit. Various species have been attested in Palestine, including the Lepus syriacus, an animal slightly smaller than its European counterpart (Lepus europaeus); it is common in wooded and cultivated areas throughout
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hare
Hare (Heb. ˒arneḇeṯ). A herbivorous rodent of the family Leporidae, a mammal closely related to the rabbit. Various species have been attested in Palestine, including the Lepus syriacus, an animal slightly smaller than its European counterpart (Lepus europaeus); it is common in wooded and cultivated
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Hare
HARE There are several species of hare in Palestine, but the animal is mentioned only rarely in the Old Testament (Lev 11:6; Deut 14:7). It was considered an unclean animal.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Hare
Hare (Heb. arnebeth) occurs only in Lev. 11:6 and Deut. 14:7 amongst the animals disallowed as food by the Mosaic law. The hare is at this day called arnel by the Arabs in Palestine and Syria. It was erroneously thought by the ancient Jews to have chewed the cud. They were no doubt misled, as in the
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Hare
Hare(Heb. ʾarnebeth was prohibited as food according to the Mosaic law (Lev. 11:6; Deut. 14:7), “because he cheweth the cud, but divideth not the hoof.” The habit of this animal is to grind its teeth and move its jaw as if it actually chewed the cud. But, like the cony (q.v.), it is not a ruminant with
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Hare
Harehare, any herbivorous rodent of the family Leporidae, in Palestine either Lepus europaeus judaeus or Lepus syriacus. It was considered unclean (Lev. 11:6; Deut. 14:7) for an inaccurate reason, namely, the assumption that a hare chews the cud.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HARE
HARE<har> ([אַרְנֶבֶת‎, ’arnebheth] (Lev 11:6; Dt 14:7); compare Arabic ’arnab, “hare”): This animal is mentioned only in the lists of unclean animals in Leviticus and Deuteronomy, Where it occurs along with the camel, the coney and the swine. The camel, the hare and the coney are unclean, `because
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