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Hail
Hail!
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hail
HailThis interjection, found only in the Gospels as the translation of Gk. chaíre, chaírete (imperative of chaírō, “rejoice”) is used as a greeting or salutation. The word “hail” is Old English and was formerly an adjective used with the verb “be,” meaning “well, sound, hale,” e.g., “Hale be thou.”
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Hail
HAIL With thunder and lightning, hail strikes frequently in Palestine during the rainy season. Hail causes damage to crops and brings injury to both man and beast (Exod 9:18–34; Hag 2:17). Hail was commonly mentioned in relation to God’s punishments of his enemies (Isa 28:2, 17; 30:30; Ps 18:13; 148:8;
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Hail
HAIL.1. Gk. chaire, “be cheerful, rejoice.” A salutation conveying a wish for the welfare of the person addressed (Luke 1:28); continued among our Saxon forefathers in “Joy to you” and “Health to you.”2. Congealed rain (Heb. bārād; Gk. chalaza) with which God defeated an army of Canaanites (Josh.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Hail!
Hail!a salutation expressive of a wish for the welfare of the person addressed; the translation of the Greek Chaire, “Rejoice” (Luke 1:8). Used in mockery in Matt. 27:29.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Hail
HAIL — a greeting that involves a wish for the good health and peace of the person addressed. Judas greeted Jesus hypocritically when he went up to Him in the Garden of Gethsemane and said, “Greetings [Hail, KJV], Rabbi!” and then kissed Him (Matt. 26:49). After His resurrection, Jesus met His disciples
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HAIL (2)
HAIL (2)<hal>: Interjection, found only in the Gospels as the translation of [χαι̂ρε, chaire], [χαίρετε, chairete], imp. of [χαίρω, chairo], “to rejoice,” is used as a greeting or salutation. The word “Hail” is Old English and was formerly an adjective, used with the verb to be, meaning “well,”
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Hail
Hail! or All Hail! a salutation, importing a wish for the health and welfare of the person addressed Luke 1:28). It was spoken in mockery by the Roman soldiers to our Lord (Matt. 27:29). Though this English word is seldom used now, it was customary among our ancestors.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Hail (2)
HAIL, hāl: Interjection, found only in the Gospels as the tr of χαῖρε, chaíre, χαίρετε; chaírete, imp. of χαίρω, chaírō, “to rejoice,” is used as a greeting or salutation. The word “Hail” is OE and was formerly an adj., used with the vb. to be, meaning “well,” “sound,” “hale,” e.g. “Hale be thou.”
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
HAIL
HAIL, HAILSTONES [בָּרָדbaradh; χάλαζα chalaza]. Hailstorms are uncommon in Syria-Palestine, although they do occur during severe thunderstorms in the spring or summer. Hail is formed when raindrops freeze after having been lifted to colder regions by upward air currents. When their masses have increased