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Haggadah
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Amplified or elaborated upon biblical narratives used for teaching. Similar to a homily. Should be distinguished from “Halakah.”Within scholarship, this term is also, at times, broadly applied to:1. material in rabbinic literature that is nonlegal;2. story, fairy tale, legend, and other similar types of literature;3. discourses which (it is assumed) took place after readings of the Torah in ancient synagogues;4. one of the portions of the types of Midrash which distinguishes legal and nonlegal exegesis.The term “Haggadah” comes from the Hebrew word for “to show” or “to tell” in order to fulfill Exodus 13:8: “And you shall tell your son on that day, saying, ‘This is because of what Yahweh did for me when I came out from Egypt.’ ”For further details, see these articles: Halakah; Midrash; Mishnah.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
Haggadah Amplified or elaborated upon biblical narratives used for teaching. Similar to a homily. Should be distinguished from “Halakah.”Within scholarship, this term is also, at times, broadly applied to:1. material in rabbinic literature that is nonlegal;2. story, fairy tale, legend, and other similar
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
HAGGADAH. A noun derived from the Hebrew root ngd, “to show,” “to announce,” “to tell,” “to testify” (Jastrow 1903: 871). In contemporary scholarship the word (also spelled aggadah) carries several meanings: (1) nonlegal material in rabbinic literature (EncJud 2: 354; 6: 141; Moore 1927: 161; Cohen 1975:
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Haggadah
Haggadah. Method of Jewish interpretation that is homiletical in character. Haggadah is usually defined negatively, that is, as that part of rabbinic teaching that is not Halakah. Haggadah and Halakah complement each other: the latter is interpretation which gives the rule, statute, or religious law
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
HAGGADAH* Method of Jewish interpretation that is homiletical in character. Haggadah is usually defined negatively, that is, as that part of rabbinic teaching that is not Halakah. Haggadah and Halakah complement each other; the latter is interpretation that gives the rule, statute, or religious law Jews
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Haggadah
Haggadah (huh-gah´duh), the interpretation of nonlegal historical and religious passages of Jewish scripture. Haggadic texts often interpret the biblical narrative by retelling and supplementing the stories contained therein. Some scholars regard the books of Chronicles as Haggadah on the earlier historical
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Haggadah
Haggadah (Heb. haggaḏâ)A noun usually understood to come from the Hebrew root ngd, “to tell,” “correspond to,” or “be in front of.” Haggadah (in the Palestinian Talmud “Aggadah”) is used for a number of different phenomena. As a type of midrash it is to be distinguished from Halakhah, which is primarily
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
Haggadah [hə gäˊdə] (Heb. haggaḏâ “narration, instruction”). In postbiblical Judaism, any nonprescriptive scriptural interpretation. Thus the Haggadah deals mainly with the historical portions of the Old Testament and reflects upon their doctrinal and ethical content and ramifications. For the most
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
HAGGADAH (based on the Hebrew root ngd, “to announce” or “to tell”; also spelled aggadah). One of the two chief divisions of rabbinic Midrash; it encompassed most forms of exegesis that did not belong to the Halakah, or legal discourse, which was legally binding.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Haggadah
Haggadah (Heb. הַגָּדָה ‘narrative’). In Judaism the term is used in two senses: (1) for the ritual of reading prayers that accompany the *Passover meal, consisting mainly of elaborations on the theme of the biblical narrative of the Exodus from Egypt; (2) (in this sense also ‘Aggadah’) for those parts
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
HaggadahHaggadah (hah-gah-dahʹ; Palestinian Talmud: ‘Aggadah’), the interpretation of the historical and religious passages of Jewish Scripture that are not legal in character. Haggadic texts often supplement the biblical narrative. A rich variety of Jewish ‘retelling’ of the tradition comes under
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Haggadah
HaggadahHebrew “anecdote, legend”; the name given to traditional stories used in the Jewish Talmud* to expound and illustrate the messages of the law and the prophets.
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Haggadah
HAGGADAH or HALAKAH In Judaism, rabbinic teaching is divided into two categories: halakah and haggadah (also spelled aggadah). Both of these terms refer to the oral teaching of the rabbis. Halakah refers to the legal teachings that are considered authoritative for religious life. Haggadah refers to the