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Hadadrimmon
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Name of either a deity or a place; appears only in Zech 12:11.There are two primary options for interpreting Hadad-rimmon: as a deity or as a place in the valley/plain of Megiddo. The genitive construction in Zech 12:11 is unclear; it could describe mourning either for or at Hadad-Rimmon. A number of English translations use the preposition “for” (CEV, ESV, LEB, NJB, NLT [second edition], NRSV, RSV, TEV), which indicates that Hadad-rimmon is a deity or person being mourned. Other translations use “at” (NET, NKJV), referring to Hadad-rimmon as the place of mourning. Other versions use “of” (CEB, KJV, NAB, NASB, NIV [1984, 2011], NLT [first edition]), which leaves the meaning ambiguous.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Hadad-rimmon
Hadad-rimmon (הֲדַדְ־רִמּוֹן‎, hadad-rimmon). Name of either a deity or a place; appears only in Zech 12:11.There are two primary options for interpreting Hadad-rimmon: as a deity or as a place in the valley/plain of Megiddo. The genitive construction in Zech 12:11 is unclear; it could describe mourning
Hadad
Hadad (הדד‎, hdd). A northwestern Mesopotamian and Syrian storm god (also known as Baal); one of the earliest known deities of this type worshiped by inhabitants of the Levant.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hadad (Deity)
HADAD (DEITY) [Heb hădad (הֲדַד)]. The ancient Semitic storm god, the deity of rain, lightning (his weapon), and thunder (his voice). “Hadad” perhaps means “thunderer” (cf. Heb hêdād, “shout”). His name was Hadad among the Amorites and Arameans, Adad among the Mesopotamians, and Haddu among the Canaanites.
Hadadrimmon (Deity)
HADADRIMMON (DEITY) [Heb hădad-rimmôn (הֲדַד־רִמֹּון)]. The ancient Semitic storm god. Zech 12:11 states that in the future there will be great mourning in Jerusalem, “as great as the mourning for Hadadrimmon in the plain of Megiddo” (RSV). Hadad is the god Baal (well known from the Ras Shamra texts
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Hadadrimmon
Hadadrimmon. Combination of two storm deities, Hadad (mentioned in the Ugaritic texts) and Rimmon (Babylonian storm god). Hadadrimmon was formerly thought to be a place. The Ras Shamra material equated Hadad with the vegetation god Baal, who was worshiped to ensure agricultural productivity. Canaanite
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Hadad-Rimmon
Hadad-Rimmon hā-dad-rimʹon, hä-dad-rimʹon [Heb. haḏaḏ-rimmôn]. A name mentioned in Zec. 12:11 of uncertain designation. The term seems to be a compound name for Baal composed by combining the Aramean Hadad, “thunderer,” with the Akkadian Rammân, “thunderer.”The two major views of its reference
Hadad
5. An alternative name for Baal, the head of the Canaanite pantheon, whose worship was expressed in fertility rites. (See Baal I; Ugarit.) The storm-god Hadad is mentioned in Assyrian inscriptions, and called on the monolith of Shalmaneser “the god of Aleppo.” In the Assyrian inscriptions he is identified
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Hadad-Rimmon
HADAD-RIMMON Combination of two storm deities, Hadad (mentioned in the Ugaritic texts) and Rimmon (Babylonian storm god). Hadad-rimmon was formerly thought to be a place. The Ras Shamra material equated Hadad with the vegetation god Baal, who was worshiped in an effort to ensure agricultural productivity.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Hadad-Rimmon
Hadad-rimmon (hay´dad-rim´uhn; Akkadian, “Hadad the Thunderer”), probably another name for the Canaanite storm god, Hadad. Rimmon (which means “thunderer” in Akkadian, but “pomegranate” in Hebrew) appears to have been used as another name for Hadad in Damascus (2 Kings 5:18). This observation has led
Hadad
Hadad (hay´dad).1 A Semitic storm god, also known as Haddu, Adad, and Addu. The meaning of the name is unclear, but it may be connected with the noise of a storm. The veneration of Hadad is attested by some of the earliest Mesopotamian texts. Apparently of West Semitic origin, the god found a special
Rimmon
Rimmon (rim´uhn; Akkadian, “thunderer”; Heb., “pomegranate”).1 A title borne by the Syrian storm god Hadad, who was worshiped in his temple in Damascus by Naaman, the Syrian army commander (2 Kings 5:18). After Naaman was cured of leprosy by the God of Israel, he asked the prophet Elisha for “two mules’
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Hadad
HADAD1. The eighth son of Ishmael (Gen 25:15, “Hadar” (q.v.) in Heb. and KJV; (1 Chr 1:30).2. The fourth early king of Edom (in Avith) who defeated Midian (Gen 36:35 f.; 1 Chr 1:46 f.).3. The eighth (and last) king of Edom (Gen 36:39; 1 Chr 1:50 f.), in Pau or Pai.4. An Edomite prince whom God raised
Hadadrimmon
HADADRIMMON. A combination of the names of two gods, the Aramean Hadad (“thunderer”) and the Akkad. Rimmon, (“thunderer”; cf. 2 Kgs 5:18), for whom public mourning was made in the plain of Esdraelon at Megiddo (Zech 12:11). In the Ras Shamra mythology, the Canaanite Baal, same as the Amorite storm-god
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Hadad-Rimmon
HADAD-RIMMON. The mourning in Jerusalem on the death of Josiah in battle with Neco II of Egypt in 609 bc is compared with that ‘of Hadad-rimmon in the plain of Megiddo’ (Zc. 12:11). It is commonly supposed to be the name of a place near Megiddo and thus to be identified with modern Rummaneh, S of that
Hadad
HADAD. The name of a Syrian deity meaning ‘the Thunderer’ (Heb. haḏaḏ; Akkad. (H)ad(d)u or Adad) the storm-god, also named in Ras Shamra texts as *Baal. A Hadad temple at Aleppo is known. The personal names Hadad, and their dialectal variant Hadar, are probably abbreviations of names compounded with
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hadad-Rimmon
Hadad-Rimmon (Heb. hăḏaḏ-rimmôn)A West Semitic deity. The name consists of the storm-god Hadad, followed by the epithet Rimmon (Akk. rammānu, “Thunderer”), which appears in Aramaic and Akkadian theophoric names and in the name of the king of Damascus, Tabrimmon (1 Kgs. 15:18). At 2 Kgs. 5:18 this
Hadad
Hadad (Heb. ḥăḏaḏ) (DEITY)The West Semitic storm-god (Ugar. Haddu, Akk. Addu), better known by his epithet, Baal (lit., “lord”). Of paramount importance in a society dependent upon rain for agriculture, he was head of the Ugaritic pantheon; Mt. Saphon, N of Ugarit, was not only his home but also
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hadadrimmon
Hadadrimmon [hāˊdăd rĭmˊən] (Heb. haḏaḏrimmôn). A composite name of the West Semitic storm-god (Akk. Addu and ramānu, both meaning “thund[er]”), probably a local manifestation of the Canaanite Baal worshipped in the region of Megiddo. At Zech. 12:11 Judah’s despair over the Davidic ruler they
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Hadad
HADAD הדדI. Hadad is the name under which the ancient Near Eastern storm god was known among various groups in the Mesopotamian and Syrian world. The god is also mentioned in a number of biblical texts and names. In this article, the biblical material will be dealt with in conjunction with the epigraphic
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Hadad
HADAD1. The god of storms, rain, and thunder among the Canaanites and Akkadians. (See Baal.)2. The name of two kings of Edom before the establishment of the Israelite monarchy (Gen 36:31–39).
Hadadrimmon
HADADRIMMON An ancient Canaanite deity connected with mourning “in the plain of Megiddo” (Zech 12:11). He is identified with the god Baal and with fertility cults.
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