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Guest
Any person attending an event or staying in the home of another person.
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Guest
Guest In the OT “guest” generally translates some form of the Hebrew verb qārāʾ, literally “call.” The noun gēr, “sojourner,” and verb gûr, “stay as a gēr,” are used of one who leaves his own tribe or village and lives elsewhere as an alien (cf. TDOT, II, s.v. “gûr” [D. Kellermann]). The usual
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Guest
guest, one invited to a feast (1 Kings 1:41; Matt. 22:10–11; Mark 6:22–26) or to lodge overnight (Luke 19:7). In the ancient Mediterranean world, people were often expected to lodge travelers and strangers and to ensure the safety and welfare of their guests, even at extreme inconvenience to themselves
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Guest
Guestguest, one invited to a feast (1 Kings 1:41; Matt. 22:10–11) or to lodge overnight (Luke 19:7). In the ancient Mediterranean world, it was considered obligatory to lodge travelers and strangers (Judg. 19:15–21; Heb. 13:2).
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Guest
GUEST — a person who receives hospitality at the home or table of another (Zeph. 1:7; Matt. 22:10–11). The scribes and Pharisees were amazed that Jesus accepted the hospitality of Zacchaeus, a chief tax collector, and went to stay at his house. They murmured, “He has gone to be a guest with a man who
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Guest
GuestThe image of guest is informed by two different guest types that are familiar to the social milieu of the biblical world. One of these is the unexpected guest, who is the recipient of the lavish hospitality rituals of the ancient world (along with occasional surprises). The other is the invited
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
GUEST
GUEST<gest> ([קָרָא‎, qara’]; [ἀνάκειμαι, anakeimai]): Oriental customs growing out of a nomadic life demand a greater abandon and freedom with respect to the relation of host and guest than are permitted by the conventionalities of western life. A householder is expected to entertain a traveler, and
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Guest
GUEST.—Hospitality was, and to a large extent still is, one of the chief virtues of Oriental life. This was due in large measure to the nomadic character of Eastern peoples, among whom there was no provision for the traveller apart from private entertainment. The casual passer-by, the unknown stranger,
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Guest
GUEST One invited to a feast (1 Sam. 9:24; 2 Sam. 15:11). Jesus outraged those in Jericho by being a guest at the home of Zacchaeus, a well-known sinner (Luke 19:7). Peter crossed racial barriers by welcoming the Gentile messengers sent by Cornelius as guests in his home (Acts 10:23).Figurative uses
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Guest
guest. Someone invited to a home or a meal. This English word occurs a few times in the OT, primarily as a rendering of the passive participle of Hebrew qārāʾ H7924, “to call” (e.g., the guests of Absalom and Adonijah at their abortive attempts to usurp the throne, 2 Sam. 15:11; 1 Ki. 1:41, 49). It
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Guest
GUEST, gest (קָרָא‎, ḳārā’; ἀνάκειμαι, anákeimai): Oriental customs growing out of a nomadic life demand a greater abandon and freedom with respect to the relation of host and guest than are permitted by the conventionalities of western life. A householder is expected to entertain a traveler, and
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
GUEST
GUEST [קְרֻאִיםqeruʾim; ἀνακειμένων anakeimenōn]. A visitor or traveler to whom HOSPITALITY is extended. Guests were dependent on the care and protection of the host (Judg 19:23). Both the OT and NT describe guests as those invited for meals or celebratory feasts (1 Sam 9:24; 2 Sam 12:4; 1 Kgs 1:41,