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Graft
Branches, Ingrafted • Graff • Grafting
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Graft
Graft [Gk. enkentrízō] (Rom. 11:17–24); AV GRAFF. The word occurs six times in Rom. 11. Paul assumed that those living about Rome were familiar with the process of grafting olive trees, for olive culture had been adopted by the Greeks and Romans in Paul’s time. It is often pointed out that Paul’s
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Graff, Graft
GRAFF, GRAFT. This is a horticultural process by which the branches from a cultivated tree may be inserted and grafting take place. In Rom 11:17 ff. the apostle Paul employs this practice in reverse; the wild branches, the Gentiles, are pictured as grafted in to the good stock of the parent tree, the
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Graft
GRAFT (Gk. egkentrizō, to “prick in”). Grafting is the process in horticulture by which a portion of a plant is made to unite with another plant, whether of the same kind or of another variety or species. The plant upon which the operation is performed is called the stock; the portion inserted or joined
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Graft
Graftthe process of inoculating fruit-trees (Rom. 11:17–24). It is peculiarly appropriate to olive-trees. The union thus of branches to a stem is used to illustrate the union of true believers to the true Church.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Graft, Grafting
GRAFT, GRAFTING — in horticulture, the process of uniting a shoot or bud with a growing plant so they grow as one. The apostle Paul used this procedure to illustrate the relationship between Jews and Gentiles in God’s plan. The natural branches of the good olive tree (Israel) were broken off (because
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Grafting
GraftingThe agricultural image of grafting occurs once in the Scriptures, although it builds on other images repeated in the both the Testaments. In Romans 11:17–24 the image of grafting is borrowed from the care of olive trees to describe the relationship of Israel to the gospel and the position of
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
GRAFT
GRAFT<graft> ([ἐγκεντρίζω, egkentrizo]; the Revised Version (British and American) “graft”; the King James Version, “graff”): The word occurs 6 times in Rom 11. Paul assumed that those living about Rome were familiar with the process of grafting olive trees, for olive culture had been adopted
The Westminster Bible Dictionary
Graff
Graff. To graff or graft is to insert a shoot or bud of a valuable tree into the branch of an inferior tree, and so, through the nourishment of the latter, to secure the good fruit of the former. The apostle Paul makes use of the process of grafting to illustrate the union between Christ and the Gentiles
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Graft
GRAFT To unite a scion (the detached, living portion of a plant that provides the leafy portion of a graft) with a stock (the part of the graft providing the roots). Olives were frequently caused to multiply by removing shoots from the base of a cultivated tree (cp. Ps. 128:3) and grafting them onto
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Graft
graft. Grafting (Gk. enkentrizō G1596) is the practice of joining a shoot or bud to a growing plant, usually by insertion. A common procedure is to insert a slip of a cultivated tree into a wild plant. In Rom. 11:17–24, however, Paul uses a metaphor that is “contrary to nature” (v. 24), namely, the
Dictionary of Biblical Prophecy and End Times
Branches, Ingrafted
Branches, IngraftedIn Romans 11:17–24 Paul uses the grafting of an olive tree as a metaphor to illustrate the inclusion of Gentile Christians in the people of God (see people of god). The normal process of ancient grafting was to remove a shoot from an olive tree that bore good fruit, though it did
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Graft
GRAFT, graft (ἐγκεντρίζω, egkentrízo; RV GRAFT; AV Graff): The word occurs 6 t in Rom 11. Paul assumed that those living about Rome were familiar with the process of grafting olive trees, for olive culture had been adopted by the Greeks and Romans in Paul’s time. The wild olive trees (Arab. colloquial,