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Governor
Apharsachites • Apharsathchites • Commissioners • Governors • Legate • Mayor • Tirshatha
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Governor
Governor. Biblical term translated from at least 10 different Hebrew root words and 5 Greek roots. English versions do not render these words consistently: they use a variety of titles, such as “overseer,” “officer,” “leader,” “judge,” and “deputy,” to translate the same Hebrew word. The situation is
Apharsathchites, Apharsachites, Apharsites
Apharsathchites, Apharsachites, Apharsites. Words used in the Book of Ezra to designate certain groups of people in Samaria who joined in writing King Artaxerxes of Babylon to stop the rebuilding of the temple in Jerusalem. Apharsathchites (Ezr 4:9 kjv) could refer to a specific ethnic group or to government
Tirshatha
Tirshatha. kjv translation of a Hebrew word designating a title of authority with the connotation of “governor” (rsv). It is given after Zerubbabel’s (Ezr 2:63) and Nehemiah’s names (Neh 8:9; 10:1), who both held the office in Jerusalem during the postexilic period.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Governor
Governor [Heb. and Aram peḥâ]; AV also PRINCE, DEPUTY; NEB also VICEROY; [Heb. hiphil of pāqaḏ—‘appoint a governor’]; AV also SET OVER; [part of māšal] (2 Ch. 23:20); [śar]; AV also PRINCE, RULER; [nāg̱îḏ]; AV also RULER; NEB also PRINCE; [šallîṭ] (Gen. 42:6); [tiršāṯaʾ] (Neh. 7:65;
Apharsathchites
Apharsathchites ə-färʹsath-kīts, af-ar-sathʹkīts [Aram ap̱arsaṯeḵāyē’]. The AV translation of a word in Ezr. 4:9 formerly identified with the Apharsachites and taken to be a tribe living in Samaria, transplanted from Persia by Asnapper (Ashurbanipal), but now generally recognized to be officials
Tirshatha
Tirshatha t̂ur-shāʹthə. The AV transliteration of Heb. tiršāṯāʾ (always with the prefixed article; RSV, NEB, “governor”), the title of the Persian provincial governor in Jerusalem (Ezr. 2:63; Neh. 7:65, 70 [MT 69]; 8:9; 10:1 [MT 2]). Tiršāṯāʾ appears to be a Persian loanword, probably derived
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Governor
GOVERNOR Biblical term translated from at least ten different Hebrew root words and five Greek roots. English versions do not render these words consistently; they use a variety of titles, such as “overseer,” “officer,” “leader,” “judge,” and “deputy,” to translate the same Hebrew word. The situation
Apharsachites, Apharsathchites, Apharsites
APHARSACHITES*, APHARSATHCHITES*, APHARSITES* Words used in the book of Ezra to designate certain groups of people in Samaria who joined in writing King Artaxerxes of Babylon to stop the rebuilding of the temple in Jerusalem. Apharsathchites (Ezr 4:9, kjv) could refer to a specific ethnic group or to
Tirshatha
TIRSHATHA* kjv translation of a Hebrew word designating a title of authority with the connotation of “governor.” It is appended to Zerubbabel’s name (Ezr 2:63) and Nehemiah’s name (Neh 8:9; 10:1), both of whom held the office in Jerusalem during the postexilic period.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Governor
governor, a ruler of a city, territory, or province. In the Bible, governors are not elected officials, nor are they supreme rulers. They are appointed by a king or emperor; while exercising considerable local authority, they only rule at the pleasure of the one who appointed them. In Genesis, Pharaoh
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Governor
GOVERNOR. The English term is used broadly by the KJV in the OT of specialized Heb. words which designate some type of delegated official (e.g., Gen 42:6; 45:26; Jdg 5:9; 2 Chr 1:2; 28:7; Jer 20:1; Zech 9:7). Heb. peḥâ (Akkadian pahåatu) was a general term that came to be used for governor during the
Tirshatha
TIRSHATHA. The KJV transliteration of Heb. tirshāthā˒, honorific title of the Persian governor of a province, given to Zerubbabel (Ezr 2:63) and Nehemiah (7:65, 70; 8:9, 10:1) as governors of Judah. It is from the Persian tarshta meaning “the feared one,” equivalent to “his excellency.”
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Tirshatha
TIRSHATHA. A title used of the governor of Judaea under the Persian empire (av, Ezr. 2:63; Ne. 7:65, 70; 8:9; 10:1). It is probably a Persian form (cf. Avestan taršta, ‘reverend’) roughly equivalent to the Eng. ‘His Excellency’. The title puzzled the Gk. translators, who either omit it or render it
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Governor
GovernorRuler of a city, territory, or province appointed by a king. Joseph became governor of all Egypt (Gen. 42:6; 45:26; cf. Acts 7:10), and Solomon named governors who exercised civic and military functions (1 Kgs. 20:14–22; 2 Chr. 9:14).References to governors in the OT frequently designate the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Governor
Governor. †A ruler of a territory, province, or city, appointed by a king.Old Testament references to a governor most commonly designate the imperial administrators of Babylon and Persia. The usual term (Heb. peḥâ, from Akk. bêl pāḫati “lord of a district”) designates an administrative level
Apharsathchites
Apharsathchites [ə färˊ sĭth kīts] (Aram. *˒ap̱arsaṯeḵayē˒, probably from Old Pers. frēstak “messenger”). KJV translation indicating a Persian tribe which the Assyrian Assurbanipal resettled in Samaria (Ezra 4:9). This Persian loanword probably means “leading officials” (RSV “governors”;
Tirshatha
Tirshatha [tûr shāˊthə]. The KJV rendering of Heb. tiršāṯā˒), which represents O. Pers. taršta, a title given to the postexilic governors of Judah (Ezra 2:63; Neh. 7:65, 70; 8:9; 10:1 [MT 2]; RSV “governor”). See Governor.
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Governor
Governor. In the Authorized Version this one English word is the representative of no less than ten Hebrew and four Greek words.1. The chief of a tribe or family. 2. A ruler in his capacity of lawgiver and dispenser of justice. 3. A ruler considered especially as having power over the property and persons
Apharsathchites
Aphar´sathchites, Aphar´sites, Aphar´sacites, the names of certain tribes, colonies from which had been planted in Samaria by the Assyrian leader Asnapper. Ezra 4:9; 5:6. The first and last are regarded as the same. Whence these tribes came is entirely a matter of conjecture.
Tirshatha
Tirshatha (always written with the article), the title of the governor of Judea under the Persians, perhaps derived from a Persian root signifying stern, severe, is added as a title after the name of Nehemiah, Neh. 8:9; 10:1, and occurs also in three other places. In the margin of the Authorized Version,
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Governor
GOVERNOR. One who rules by authority delegated from a supreme ruler to whom he is responsible. Gedaliah was “appointed over” and therefore governor for Nebuchadnezzar II in Palestine after the fall of Jerusalem in 587 b.c. (Jer. 40:5; 41:2). Persian governors had administration over the Jews after the
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Governor
Governor(1.) Heb. nagid, a prominent, conspicuous person, whatever his capacity: as, chief of the royal palace (2 Chr. 28:7; comp. 1 Kings 4:6), chief of the temple (1 Chr. 9:11; Jer. 20:1), the leader of the Aaronites (1 Chr. 12:27), keeper of the sacred treasury (26:24), captain of the army (13:1),
Tirshatha
Tirshathaa word probably of Persian origin, meaning “severity,” denoting a high civil dignity. The Persian governor of Judea is so called (Ezra 2:63; Neh. 7:65, 70). Nehemiah is called by this name in Neh. 8:9; 10:1, and the “governor” (pehah) in 5:18. Probably, therefore, tirshatha = pehah = the modern
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Governor
Governorgovernor, the ruler of a Roman province, usually a former consul. Pilate was governor over the province of Judea when Jesus was crucified (Matt. 27:2). In the larger senatorial provinces a governor would usually serve for three years. Governors of provinces in which two to four legions were