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Gospel of the Hebrews
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical gospel from the late first—early second century. It is no longer extant but is mentioned and quoted by several early church fathers. The work appears to have resembled the New Testament Gospels in its coverage of the life of Jesus from birth to resurrection, but includes several unique details. It might have been a Hebrew or Aramaic version of Matthew’s Gospel.The Gospel of the Hebrews does not appear in an extant ancient Bible or canonical list. It is often associated with the Gospel of the Nazarenes and the Gospel of the Ebionites—other now-lost texts that might have been variations of the Gospel of the Hebrews.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gospel of the Hebrews
Gospel of the Hebrews A noncanonical gospel from the late first—early second century. It is no longer extant but is mentioned and quoted by several early church fathers. The work appears to have resembled the New Testament Gospels in its coverage of the life of Jesus from birth to resurrection, but includes
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Hebrews, Gospel of the
HEBREWS, GOSPEL OF THE. The title ascribed in antiquity to at least one and probably two Jewish-Christian narrative gospels that are extant in fragmentary form in a few quotations preserved in early church writings. Because of the scantiness of the citations and the uncertainty of their patristic source
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Hebrews, Gospel according to The
Hebrews, Gospel According to theA Jewish-Christian apocryphal Gospel, written in Egypt ca. 150 c.e. It was known and used by Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150–215), Origen (ca. 185–254), and Didymus the Blind (ca. 313–398), all of whom were Egyptian writers. Eusebius (ca. 260–340) also knew the Gospel
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Hebrews, Gospel According to the
Hebrews, Gospel According to the. †An apocryphal Greek gospel which originated among Jewish Christians in Egypt during the late first-early second centuries A.D. Although it may have approximated in length the gospel of Matthew (cf. Nicephorus Stich.), the work now survives only in fragments quoted
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Hebrews, Gospel according to the
Hebrews, Gospel according to the. An *apocryphal Gospel in use among Jewish Christians, also called the ‘Gospel of the Hebrews’ and the ‘Hebrew Gospel’. It is mentioned by *Clement of Alexandria and cited by *Origen. *Epiphanius seems to identify it with the ‘Gospel according to the *Ebionites’, *Jerome
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
HEBREWS, GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THE
HEBREWS, GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THE([Εὐαγγέλιον καθ̓Ἑβραίους, Euaggelion kath’ Hebraious], [τὸἙβραϊκόν, to Hebraikon], [τὸἸουδαϊκόν, to Ioudaikon]; Evangelium Hebraeorum, Judeorum): “The Gospel according to the Hebrews” was a work of early Christian literature to which reference is frequently
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Hebrews, Gospel of the (Writing)
Hebrews, Gospel of the. A Gospel according to the Hebrews is mentioned by Clement of Alexandria, who quotes from it a saying also found, with some variation, in the Oxyrhynchus Sayings of Jesus (POxy 654) and in the Coptic Gospel of Thomas (logion 2; see Thomas, Gospel of). This material has led to the
Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, Second Edition
5.1. Gospel of the Hebrews
5.1. Gospel of the Hebrews. The most important discussions of the Gospel of the Hebrews come from Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Cyril of Jerusalem and Jerome. The passages quoted include sayings of Jesus and references to his baptism and resurrection. Apparently, this Gospel depicts Jewish leaders present
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Gospel according to the Hebrews
GOSPEL ACCORDING TO THE HEBREWSThe Gospel according to the Hebrews (not to be confused with the New Testament Epistle to the Hebrews) was a first- or second-century work that purports to contain sayings of Jesus not recorded in the four canonical Gospels. It was apparently written in Aramaic by a Jewish
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
HEBREWS, GOSPEL OF THE
HEBREWS, GOSPEL OF THE. A Jewish-Christian source of widely divergent contents, composed in Greek, probably in ALEXANDRIA, Egypt, in the 2nd cent. ce, available to us today only in fragmentary quotations from early church fathers and medieval scholars. Still unresolved is the exact relationship between