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Gospel of Matthew
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
First book of the New Testament; traditionally attributed to the Apostle Matthew (although no author is named in the text). The Gospel of Matthew contains more teachings of Jesus than any other Gospel, with well-known passages including the Beatitudes (5:3–12), the Lord’s Prayer (6:9–13), the Golden Rule (7:12), and the Great Commission (28:19–20). Matthew is the only Gospel to record the visitation of the magi (Matt 2:1–12), the renaming of Simon as Peter (Matt 16:13–20), and the parables of the Wheat and the Tares (Matt 13:24–30) and the Sheep and the Goats (Matt 25:31–46). In nearly every known manuscript of the Gospels, Matthew is placed first.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Matthew, Gospel of
Matthew, Gospel of First book of the New Testament; traditionally attributed to the Apostle Matthew (although no author is named in the text). The Gospel of Matthew contains more teachings of Jesus than any other Gospel, with well-known passages including the Beatitudes (5:3–12), the Lord’s Prayer (6:9–13),
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Matthew, Gospel of
MATTHEW, GOSPEL OF. The second longest of the four canonical gospels, traditionally placed first in the NT canon and hence referred to as “the first gospel” (without prejudice to the actual historical order in which the four Gospels were written). The ascription of this gospel to the apostle Matthew
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Matthew, Gospel of
Matthew, Gospel of. First book of the NT. Nowhere does the text of Matthew itself clearly identify the author. Yet, as did the ancient church, we may ascribe authorship to Matthew the apostle.Matthew wrote to a community of Greek-speaking Jewish Christians, located in a center such as Antioch in Syria.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Matthew, Gospel according to
Matthew, Gospel according to The Gospel of Matthew dominated the attention of the early Church, at least so far as the Synoptic Gospels are concerned, to the extent that it all but eclipsed the others. The church fathers cited Matthew far more than either of the other Synoptics (cf. E. Massaux, Influence
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Matthew, Gospel of
MATTHEW, GOSPEL OF First Gospel and first book of the NT.PreviewAuthorDate and ProvenancePurposeContentAuthor Nowhere does the text of Matthew itself clearly identify the author. Yet, as did the ancient church, we may ascribe authorship to Matthew the apostle. He was otherwise known as Levi
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Matthew, Gospel according To
Matthew, Gospel According to, the first Gospel in the nt.Contents: Matthew’s Gospel opens with a genealogy that traces Jesus’s descent from Abraham (1:1–17), followed by an account of Jesus’s virgin birth and such related events as the visit of the magi (1:18–2:23). Then the narrative shifts to recount
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Matthew, Gospel of (Writing)
MATTHEW, GOSPEL OFIntroductionThe first Gospel was the most widely used of the Gospels in the 2nd cen. a.d. church. Its initial popularity has continued, for today Matthew is still probably the most widely read Gospel.Matthew has a number of indications of having been originally written in Gr. Its
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Matthew, Gospel Of
Matthew, Gospel ofThe first of the NT Gospels in canonical order. It was composed during the last decades of the 1st century, when Jews and Christians alike were faced with the task of rearticulating their self-understanding in light of the destruction of the temple and the holy city, Jerusalem. Regardless
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Matthew, Gospel of (Writing)
Matthew, Gospel of. †The first book of the New Testament and the first (in canonical order) of the four Gospels.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Matthew, Gospel Of
MATTHEW, GOSPEL OF The first book of the canon of the New Testament and unanimously believed in Christian antiquity to have been the first of the four Gospels to have been written down. This tradition went unchallenged until modern times, and the prevailing opinion among most twentieth-century scholars
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