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Gospel of Eve
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical “lost gospel” quoted by early church father Epiphanius to demonstrate the beliefs of a Gnostic group (the Nicolaitans) that he viewed as heretical (Panarion 26.2.6–3.1; and possibly in 26.5.1). The Gospel of Eve, according to Epiphanius, was apparently a supposed account of someone (likely Eve) standing on a mountain and seeing a tall man and a smaller man (who are perhaps the same person in two different forms) speak a revelation. No extant manuscripts of the work remain and it was never widely authoritative in the early church period.Epiphanius records this line from the Gospel of Eve: “I stood upon a lofty mount, and saw a man who was tall, and another, little of stature. And I heard as it were the sound of thunder and drew close to hear, and he spoke with me and said, ‘I am you and you are me and wherever you are, there I am; and I am sown in all things. And from wherever you will gather you me, but in gathering me, you gather yourself” (Panarion 26.3.1; translation adapted from Frank Williams). Epiphanius goes on to critique the quote, “What devil’s sowing? How has he managed to divert men’s minds, and distract them from the speech of the truth to things that are foolish and untenable?” (Panarion 26.3.1; translation adapted from Williams).The Gospel of Eve may have been composed in the second century ad, possibly to explain the Gnostic belief that Eve discovered “the food of saving knowledge” through a revelation from the serpent (Hans-Josef Klauck, Apocryphal Gospels, 207; compare Apocryphon of John). Just before his citation, Epiphanius notes that those who speak of the Gospel of Eve “sow crop in her name because … [they claim] she got the food of knowledge by a revelation from the serpent which spoke to her.… so the cheats’ sowing has come up to correspond with every form of evil” (Panarion 26.2.6; translation adapted from Williams). Early church father Hippolytus may also allude to the Gospel of Eve in his work The Refutation of All Heresies when he describes the viewpoints of the heretical group “the Peratae” (Peratics), a Gnostic sect (Refutation 5.11; compare 5.2).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Eve A noncanonical “lost gospel” quoted by early church father Epiphanius to demonstrate the beliefs of a Gnostic group (the Nicolaitans) that he viewed as heretical (Panarion 26.2.6–3.1; and possibly in 26.5.1). The Gospel of Eve, according to Epiphanius, was apparently a supposed account
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Eve, Gospel of (Writing)
Eve, Gospel of A Gnostic work mentioned by Epiphanius (haer. 26.2ff). It is possible that the subject of this work is Eve’s discovery of tó brōma té̄s gnó̄seōs (“the food of gnó̄sis,” or saving knowledge) through a revelation from the serpent (haer. 26.2.6), and that this may account for its being
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
EVE, GOSPEL OF (Writing)
EVE, GOSPEL OFA Gnostic doctrinal treatise mentioned by Epiphanius (Haer., xxvi.2 ff) in which Jesus is represented as saying in a loud voice, “I am thou, and thou art I, and wherever thou art there am I, and in all things I am sown. And from whencesoever thou gatherest me, in gathering me thou gatherest
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Eve, Gospel Of
EVE, GOSPEL OF. A book called the Gospel of Eve is said by Epiphanius (Haer. xxvi. p. 84) to have been current among some Gnostic sects; and from it apparently are taken two extracts which he proceeds to give. We are probably to take as mere sarcasm of Epiphanius his statement that this gospel was called
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Eve, Gospel of (Writing)
Eve, Gospel of. A Gospel of Eve is mentioned only by Epiphanius (Pan. 26.2–3 [GCS, 1:277–78]), who also gives the only certain quotation. On a high mountain, the narrator (unidentified) sees two figures and is thus addressed: “I am you and you are I, and where you are, there am I; and I am sown in all