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Gospel of Basilides
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A noncanonical, no longer extant gospel mentioned by church father Origen as one of “many” used by heretics. Origen stated, “Basilides, too, dared to write a gospel and give it his own name” (Homily on Luke 1.2). From the middle of the third century, this gospel may have circulated among the followers of Basilides, a leader who taught in Alexandria and held Gnostic beliefs. Early church fathers viewed Basilides as heretical (see Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 4.7.3–8; Irenaeus Adversus Haereses 1.34.3–6; Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 7.14–27). Origen’s mention of the Gospel of Basilides, and the approximate dates of Basilides’ teachings in Alexandria, suggests a date for the gospel of about the mid-second century ad. The Gospel of Basilides was never widely authoritative in the early church period.(For further information on Gnosticism and why it was deemed heretical by the early church fathers, see this article: Gnosticism. For information on the process of canonization, see this article: Canon, New Testament.)
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The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gospel of Basilides
Gospel of Basilides A noncanonical, no longer extant gospel mentioned by church father Origen as one of “many” used by heretics. Origen stated, “Basilides, too, dared to write a gospel and give it his own name” (Homily on Luke 1.2). From the middle of the third century, this gospel may have circulated
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Basilides, Gospel Of
Basilides, Gospel ofA lost Gospel attested by Origen (Hom. Luke 1.5.5–7) as composed by Basilides, a Christian poet-philosopher active in Alexandria ca. 132–135, whose movement continued there into the 4th century, and whose eclectic, wide-ranging writings, including some of the earliest commentaries
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Basilides, Gospel of (Writing)
BASILIDES [băsˊĭ līˊdēz], GOSPEL OF. An apocryphal gospel, perhaps a commentary on Luke in which the author attempted to set forth his own contrasting views. The work is attributed to Basilides, a second-century A.D. Gnostic. It is cited by various of the Church Fathers, but of its twenty-four books
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
BASILIDES, GOSPEL OF
BASILIDES, GOSPEL OF. Basilides was a gnostic thinker active in Alexandria between 120–140 ce and known for his elaborate mythological teachings. IRENAEUS, HIPPOLYTUS, and CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA are early witnesses for his system of thought, but they unfortunately disagree on fundamental issues. ORIGEN